Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a big spritesheet (3808x1632) composed by 42 frames. I would present an animation with these frames and I use a thread to load a bitmap array with all the frames, with a splash screen waiting for its end. I'm not using a SurfaceView (and a draw function of a canvas), I just load frame by frame in an ImageView in my main layout. My approach is similar to Loading a large number of images from a spritesheet The completion actually takes almost 15 seconds, not acceptable.

I use this kind of function:

for (int i=0; i<TotalFramesTeapotBG; i++) {
            xStartTeapotBG = (i % framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameWidthTeapotBG; 
            yStartTeapotBG = (i / framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameHeightTeapotBG;
            mVectorTeapotBG.add(Bitmap.createBitmap(framesBitmapTeapotBG, xStartTeapotBG, yStartTeapotBG, frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG));
        }

framesBitmapTeapotBG is the big spritesheet. Looking more deeply, I've read in the logcat that the createBitmap function takes a lot of time, maybe because the spritesheet is too big. I found somewhere that I could make a window on the big spritesheet, using the rect function and canvas, creating small bitmaps to be loaded in the array, but it was not really clear. I'm talking about that post: cut the portion of bitmap

My question is: how can I speed the spritesheet cut?

Edit: I'm trying to use this approach but I cannot see the final animation:

    for (int i=0; i<TotalFramesTeapotBG; i++) {
        xStartTeapotBG = (i % framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameWidthTeapotBG; 
        yStartTeapotBG = (i / framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameHeightTeapotBG;
        Bitmap bmFrame = Bitmap.createBitmap(frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);
        Canvas c = new Canvas(bmFrame); 
        Rect src = new Rect(xStartTeapotBG, yStartTeapotBG, frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG); 
        Rect dst = new Rect(0, 0, frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG);  
        c.drawBitmap(framesBitmapTeapotBG, src, dst, null);         
        mVectorTeapotBG.add(bmFrame);
    }

Probably, the Bitmap bmFrame is not correctly managed.

share|improve this question
1  
That sprite sheet is HUGE! –  AedonEtLIRA Sep 7 '11 at 22:01
1  
Addendum: Why is it so huge!? –  AedonEtLIRA Sep 7 '11 at 22:02

4 Answers 4

The short answer is better memory management.

The sprite sheet you're loading is huge, and then you're making a copy of it into a bunch of little bitmaps. Supposing the sprite sheet can't be any smaller, I'd suggest taking one of two approaches:

  1. Use individual bitmaps. This will reduce the memory copies as well as the number of times Dalvik will have to grow the heap. However, these benefits may be limited by the need to load many images off the filesystem instead of just one. This would be the case in a normal computer, but Android systems may get different results since they're run off flash memory.
  2. Blit directly from your sprite sheet. When drawing, just draw straight from sprite sheet using something like Canvas.drawBitmap(Bitmap bitmap, Rect src, Rect dst, Paint paint). This will reduce your file loads to one large allocation that probably only needs to happen once in the lifetime of your activity.

I think the second option is probably the better of the two since it will be easier on the memory system and be less work for the GC.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, in fact your second option seems to me the better one. I'm trying to do it and I edited my first question. –  Zappescu Sep 8 '11 at 8:08

Use a LevelListDrawable. Cut the sprites into individual frames and drop them in your drawable resource directory. Either programmatically or through an xml based level-list drawable create your drawable. Then use ImageView.setImageLevel() to pick your frame.

share|improve this answer
    
Your approach is clear and I used already before for other apps, but for a spritesheet with 42 frames it's really boring to make all of that by myself. I'm looking for an automatic procedure starting from the spritesheet and doing all the rest automatically. –  Zappescu Sep 8 '11 at 8:02
1  
Just chop it, programmatically, like you were doing before and output the Bitmaps to a file. Check out [Bitmap.compress()](developer.android.com/reference/android/graphics/…, int, java.io.OutputStream)). –  Dan S Sep 8 '11 at 16:42
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks to stevehb for the suggestion, I finally got it:

for (int i=0; i<TotalFramesTeapotBG; i++) {
            xStartTeapotBG = (i % framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameWidthTeapotBG; 
            yStartTeapotBG = (i / framesInRowsTeapotBG) * frameHeightTeapotBG;
            Bitmap bmFrame = Bitmap.createBitmap(frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG, Bitmap.Config.ARGB_8888);
            Canvas c = new Canvas(bmFrame);  
            Rect src = new Rect(xStartTeapotBG, yStartTeapotBG, xStartTeapotBG+frameWidthTeapotBG, yStartTeapotBG+frameHeightTeapotBG); 
            Rect dst = new Rect(0, 0, frameWidthTeapotBG, frameHeightTeapotBG);  
            c.drawBitmap(framesBitmapTeapotBG, src, dst, null);         
            mVectorTeapotBG.add(bmFrame);
        }

The computation time falls incredibly! :)

share|improve this answer
    
@Zappescu.. Hi am stuck with the same problem ... Any code Snippet will be really helpful .. please –  Ryderz Mar 22 at 19:04

I use a method of slicing based on rows and columns. However your sprite sheet is rather huge. You have to think you are putting that whole sheet into memory. 3808x1632x4 is the size of the image in memory.

Anyway, what I do is I take an image (lets say a 128x128) and then tell it there are 4 columns and 2 rows in the Sprite(bitmap, 4, 2) constructor. Then you can slice and dice based on that. bitmap.getWidth() / 4 etc... pretty simple stuff. However if you want to do some real stuff use OpenGL and use textures.

Oh I also forgot to mention there are some onDraw stuff that needs to happen. Basically you keep an index counter and slice a rectangle from the bitmap and draw that from a source rectangle to a destination rectangle on the canvas.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.