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I'm new to Python logging and I can easily see how it is preferrable to the home-brew solution I have come up with.

One question I can't seem to find an answer to: how do I squelch logging messages on a per-method/function basis?

My hypothetical module contains a single function. As I develop, the log calls are a great help:

logging.basicConfig(level=logging.DEBUG,
                format=('%(levelname)s: %(funcName)s(): %(message)s'))
log = logging.getLogger()

my_func1():
    stuff...
    log.debug("Here's an interesting value: %r" % some_value)
    log.info("Going great here!")
    more stuff...

As I wrap up my work on 'my_func1' and start work on a second function, 'my_func2', the logging messages from 'my_func1' start going from "helpful" to "clutter".

Is there single-line magic statement, such as 'logging.disabled_in_this_func()' that I can add to the top of 'my_func1' to disable all the logging calls within 'my_func1', but still leave logging calls in all other functions/methods unchanged?

Thanks

linux, Python 2.7.1

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

The trick is to create multiple loggers.

There are several aspects to this.

First. Don't use logging.basicConfig() at the beginning of a module. Use it only inside the main-import switch

 if __name__ == "__main__":
     logging.basicConfig(...)
     main()
     logging.shutdown()

Second. Never get the "root" logger, except to set global preferences.

Third. Get individual named loggers for things which might be enabled or disabled.

log = logging.getLogger(__name__)

func1_log = logging.getLogger( "{0}.{1}".format( __name__, "my_func1" )

Now you can set logging levels on each named logger.

log.setLevel( logging.INFO )
func1_log.setLevel( logging.ERROR )
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the recommendation on putting logging configuration inside the main-import switch. Good to know. Is using the root logger not recommended even for a single-module script like I'm working on now? Could you please clarify the cons for doing so? – JS. Sep 8 '11 at 23:28
2  
" using the root logger not recommended". Period. Don't use it. It's "anonymous". You want only named loggers so you can configure and filter. – S.Lott Sep 9 '11 at 1:56

You could create a decorator that would temporarily suspend logging, ala:

from functools import wraps

def suspendlogging(func):
    @wraps(func)
    def inner(*args, **kwargs):
        previousloglevel = log.getEffectiveLevel()
        try:
            return func(*args, **kwargs)
        finally:
            log.setLevel(previousloglevel)
    return inner

@suspendlogging
def my_func1(): ...

Caveat: that would also suspend logging for any function called from my_func1 so be careful how you use it.

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Good approach for a lot of applications. Thanks! – JS. Sep 8 '11 at 23:29
    
I guess this should have been decorator factory taking the logger to suspend. – Piotr Dobrogost Sep 19 '11 at 20:16
    
Please correct me if I am wrong, but looks to me that this would only disable one logger named log. If there are several loggers being used at the same time, e.g., in a Django application, how can this disable all loggers? – Subhamoy Sengupta Nov 13 '13 at 13:53

You could use a decorator:

import logging
import functools

def disable_logging(func):
    @functools.wraps(func)
    def wrapper(*args,**kwargs):
        logging.disable(logging.DEBUG)
        result = func(*args,**kwargs)
        logging.disable(logging.NOTSET)
        return result
    return wrapper

@disable_logging
def my_func1(...):
share|improve this answer
    
Hah! You beat me by seconds. Be careful inside wrapper as it won't re-enable logging of the func() call throws an exception. That's why I use the try/finally phrase to guarantee that logging is re-enabled regardless of whether func() succeeds. – Kirk Strauser Sep 7 '11 at 22:22

I took me some time to learn how to implement the sub-loggers as suggested by S.Lott.

Given how tough it was to figure out how to setup logging when I was starting out, I figure it's long past time to share what I learned since then.

Please keep in mind that this isn't the only way to set up loggers/sub-loggers, nor is it the best. It's just the way I use to get the job done to fit my needs. I hope this is helpful to someone. Please feel free to comment/share/critique.


Let's assume we have a simple library we like to use. From the main program, we'd like to be able to control the logging messages we get from the library. Of course we're considerate library creators, so we configure our library to make this easy.

First, the main program:

# some_prog.py

import os
import sys

# Be sure to give Vinay Sajip thanks for his creation of the logging module
# and tireless efforts to answer our dumb questions about it.  Thanks Vinay!
import logging

# This module will make understanding how Python logging works so much easier.
# Also great for debugging why your logging setup isn't working.
# Be sure to give it's creator Brandon Rhodes some love.  Thanks Brandon!
import logging_tree

# Example library
import some_lib

# Directory, name of current module
current_path, modulename = os.path.split(os.path.abspath(__file__))
modulename = modulename.split('.')[0]   # Drop the '.py'


# Set up a module-local logger
# In this case, the logger will be named 'some_prog'
log = logging.getLogger(modulename)

# Add a Handler.  The Handler tells the logger *where* to send the logging
# messages.  We'll set up a simple handler that send the log messages
# to standard output (stdout)
stdout_handler = logging.StreamHandler(stream=sys.stdout)
log.addHandler(stdout_handler)


def some_local_func():
    log.info("Info: some_local_func()")
    log.debug("Debug: some_local_func()")


if __name__ == "__main__":

    # Our main program, here's where we tie together/enable the logging infra
    # we've added everywhere else.

    # Use logging_tree.printout() to see what the default log levels
    # are on our loggers.  Make logging_tree.printout() calls at any place in
    # the code to see how the loggers are configured at any time.
    #
    # logging_tree.printout()

    print("# Logging level set to default (i.e. 'WARNING').")
    some_local_func()
    some_lib.some_lib_func()
    some_lib.some_special_func()

    # We know a reference to our local logger, so we can set/change its logging
    # level directly.  Let's set it to INFO:
    log.setLevel(logging.INFO)
    print("# Local logging set to 'INFO'.")
    some_local_func()
    some_lib.some_lib_func()
    some_lib.some_special_func()


    # Next, set the local logging level to DEBUG:
    log.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)
    print("# Local logging set to 'DEBUG'.")
    some_local_func()
    some_lib.some_lib_func()
    some_lib.some_special_func()


    # Set the library's logging level to DEBUG.  We don't necessarily
    # have a reference to the library's logger, but we can use
    # logging_tree.printout() to see the name and then call logging.getLogger()
    # to create a local reference.  Alternately, we could dig through the
    # library code.
    lib_logger_ref = logging.getLogger("some_lib")
    lib_logger_ref.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

    # The library logger's default handler, NullHandler() won't output anything.
    # We'll need to add a handler so we can see the output -- in this case we'll
    # also send it to stdout.
    lib_log_handler = logging.StreamHandler(stream=sys.stdout)
    lib_logger_ref.addHandler(lib_log_handler)
    lib_logger_ref.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

    print("# Logging level set to DEBUG in both local program and library.")
    some_local_func()
    some_lib.some_lib_func()
    some_lib.some_special_func()


    print("# ACK! Setting the library's logging level to DEBUG output")
    print("# all debug messages from the library.  (Use logging_tree.printout()")
    print("# To see why.)")
    print("# Let's change the library's logging level to INFO and")
    print("# only some_special_func()'s level to DEBUG so we only see")
    print("# debug message from some_special_func()")

    # Raise the logging level of the libary and lower the logging level
    # of 'some_special_func()' so we see only some_special_func()'s
    # debugging-level messages.
    # Since it is a sub-logger of the library's main logger, we don't need
    # to create another handler, it will use the handler that belongs
    # to the library's main logger.
    lib_logger_ref.setLevel(logging.INFO)
    special_func_sub_logger_ref = logging.getLogger('some_lib.some_special_func')
    special_func_sub_logger_ref.setLevel(logging.DEBUG)

    print("# Logging level set to DEBUG in local program, INFO in library and")
    print("# DEBUG in some_lib.some_special_func()")
    some_local_func()
    some_lib.some_lib_func()
    some_lib.some_special_func()

Next, our library:

# some_lib.py

import os
import logging

# Directory, name of current module
current_path, modulename = os.path.split(os.path.abspath(__file__))
modulename = modulename.split('.')[0]   # Drop the '.py'

# Set up a module-local logger.  In this case the logger will be
# named 'some_lib'
log = logging.getLogger(modulename)

# In libraries, always default to NullHandler so you don't get
# "No handler for X" messages.
# Let your library callers set up handlers and set logging levels
# in their main program so the main program can decide what level
# of messages they want to see from your library.
log.addHandler(logging.NullHandler())

def some_lib_func():
    log.info("Info: some_lib.some_lib_func()")
    log.debug("Debug: some_lib.some_lib_func()")

def some_special_func():
    """
    This func is special (not really).  It just has a function/method-local
    logger in addition to the library/module-level logger.
    This allows us to create/control logging messages down to the
    function/method level.

    """
    # Our function/method-local logger
    func_log = logging.getLogger('%s.some_special_func' % modulename)

    # Using the module-level logger
    log.info("Info: some_special_func()")

    # Using the function/method-level logger, which can be controlled separately
    # from both the library-level logger and the main program's logger.
    func_log.debug("Debug: some_special_func(): This message can be controlled at the function/method level.")

Now let's run the program, along with the commentary track:

# Logging level set to default (i.e. 'WARNING').

Notice there's no output at the default level since we haven't generated any WARNING-level messages.

# Local logging set to 'INFO'.
Info: some_local_func()

The library's handlers default to NullHandler(), so we see only output from the main program. This is good.

# Local logging set to 'DEBUG'.
Info: some_local_func()
Debug: some_local_func()

Main program logger set to DEBUG. We still see no output from the library. This is good.

# Logging level set to DEBUG in both local program and library.
Info: some_local_func()
Debug: some_local_func()
Info: some_lib.some_lib_func()
Debug: some_lib.some_lib_func()
Info: some_special_func()
Debug: some_special_func(): This message can be controlled at the function/method level.

Oops.

# ACK! Setting the library's logging level to DEBUG output
# all debug messages from the library.  (Use logging_tree.printout()
# To see why.)
# Let's change the library's logging level to INFO and
# only some_special_func()'s level to DEBUG so we only see
# debug message from some_special_func()
# Logging level set to DEBUG in local program, INFO in library and
# DEBUG in some_lib.some_special_func()
Info: some_local_func()
Debug: some_local_func()
Info: some_lib.some_lib_func()
Info: some_special_func()
Debug: some_special_func(): This message can be controlled at the function/method level.

It's also possible to get only debug messages only from some_special_func(). Use logging_tree.printout() to figure out which logging levels to tweak to make that happen!

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