Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How can I tell (from inside of .emacs) whether or the Emacs version is Cocoa? I only want some configuration options to apply when they are loaded in Cocoa Emacs and not in the command-line version.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try (featurep 'ns) to check for the NextStep emacs feature. See also C-h v window-system, can check if that variable is 'ns.

share|improve this answer
    
It looks like the system-type variable equals "darwin" for Cocoa Emacs versions. How can I check for that value in .emacs? I'm not very good with Emacs Lisp. –  David Sanders Sep 7 '11 at 22:24
    
What about the first one? –  Ross Patterson Sep 7 '11 at 22:24
    
It looks like the first one contains the text "darwin" for cocoa emacs versions. Actually, the second one has a symbol value of darwin, not a string value like I thought. –  David Sanders Sep 7 '11 at 22:30
    
Updated answer, try that. –  Ross Patterson Sep 7 '11 at 22:34
    
Sweet, that worked. Thanks! –  David Sanders Sep 7 '11 at 22:40

It's sufficient to do something similar to the following:

To see if you're on a Mac and not running in the command-line version:

(when (and (eq system-type 'darwin) window-system)
  (setq my-option "cocoa"))

To see if you're on a Mac and are running in the command-line version:

(when (and (eq system-type 'darwin) (not window-system))
  (setq my-option "command-line"))

EDIT: I edited my answer to check for both Mac (system-type) and not command-line (window-system).

share|improve this answer
    
I tried that and it didn't seem to work, but maybe I should give it another shot. –  David Sanders Sep 7 '11 at 22:42
    
I edited my answer so that it checked both criteria. See if that does the job for you. –  zev Sep 7 '11 at 22:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.