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I have a quick question..is there any difference in these:

struct myinnerstruct
{
    int x;

};

struct mystruct
{
    struct myinnerstruct m;
    int y;
};

AND THIS

struct mystruct
{
    int x;
    struct myinnerstruct
    {
        int y;
    };
    struct myinnerstruct m; 
};

These both work as far as I can tell, but I'm wondering if there's a reason to pick one or the other. Thanks

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Is the second variant even legal C? –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 7 '11 at 22:21
    
I haven't really been able to find any examples of it online. My tests for both return the same results. So AFAIK, it is. –  prelic Sep 7 '11 at 22:23
    
The following would also work, to make the second one a bit shorter: struct mystruct { int x; struct myinnerstruct { int y; } m; }; IMHO, the best reason to define a struct inside another struct is when the inner struct is used exclusively and perhaps repeatedly as a member of the outer struct, i.e. when a struct has to have many "groups" storing similar information for different purposes. –  Chris Lutz Sep 7 '11 at 22:23
    
@prelic: GCC throws a warning... –  Oli Charlesworth Sep 7 '11 at 22:24
    
@Oli - If the OP combines the struct definition and member declaration into one line, then yes. –  Chris Lutz Sep 7 '11 at 22:24
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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The difference is that the second one is invalid.

The stuff between the { and } in a struct declaration is a sequence of member declarations. Your

    struct myinnerstruct
    {
        int y;
    };

is a type declaration; it doesn't declare a member of the enclosing struct, so it's illegal in that context.

What you can do is this:

struct mystruct
{
    int x;
    struct myinnerstruct
    {
        int y;
    } m;
};

The declaration of m is a member declaration, so it's ok; it also declares the type struct myinnerstruct. But in my opinion, it's poor style. gcc seems to think that the type struct myinnerstruct remains visible after the declaration of struct mystruct is completed. It's probably right (I'd have to check the standard), but it's counterintuitive; it's reasonable to expect that its visibility ends at the enclosing }.

If you really want a struct within a struct like that, and you're not going to use struct myinnerstruct anywhere else, you could leave it without a tag:

struct mystruct
{
    int x;
    struct
    {
        int y;
    } m;
};

But then you might as well declare y as a member of struct mystruct.

If you want struct innerstruct to be a named type, just declare it separately, as you did in your first example.

EDIT: And here's the explanation of why struct innerstruct remains visible.

The C99 standard (large PDF), section 6.2.1 paragraph 2, says:

For each different entity that an identifier designates, the identifier is visible (i.e., can be used) only within a region of program text called its scope. Different entities designated by the same identifier either have different scopes, or are in different name spaces. There are four kinds of scopes: function, file, block, and function prototype. (A function prototype is a declaration of a function that declares the types of its parameters.)

The { braces } in a struct declaration do not define a block, nor do they define any of the other possible kinds of scope, so anything declared between the braces is not scoped to that region; it must be scoped to some surrounding context. It happens that the syntax lets you declare struct myinnerstruct inside another struct definition -- but only if it's part of a member definition. I think this is allowed only because the designers of the language didn't go to any extra effort to disallow it; it's just a side effect of other rules. You can do it, but I don't recommend it.

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So if I wanted to have a [inner] struct which couldn't be declared on its own (but only by declaring with an outer struct), I should nest the definitions but leave the inner one without a tag, as in your example? –  prelic Sep 7 '11 at 22:52
    
@prelic: It depends. Why do you want an inner struct in the first place? In the (presumably) simplified code you've shown us, there's only one instance of struct innerstruct, and it's a member of struct mystruct. Why not flatten the structure, so that the members of struct innerstruct become direct members of struct mystruct? I'm not necessarily saying that that's the right solution, but knowing why it isn't (if it isn't) would help in determining how to solve your actual problem. –  Keith Thompson Sep 7 '11 at 22:58
    
Yeah I realize in this example, it's trivial to flatten my structure. But where I'm actually applying this, it's not as clear cut. I work with (reasonably) large structures, and these structures make up bigger structures. It's significant whether or not the component structures are visible outside of the set of structures. –  prelic Sep 7 '11 at 23:30
    
Well, you can't actually hide a structure type inside another one, unless you leave it without a tag. If it needs a tag, I'd declare it outside the containing structure, which more clearly shows the actual visibility. –  Keith Thompson Sep 8 '11 at 0:29
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A reason to choose one or the other would be conventional expectations.

A structure declaration nested within another would not be expected to be reused elsewhere, even though it can be.

Also, there is a psychological clash by not putting things of the same level of abstraction side-by-side. It is perfectly legal to do it, but it makes understanding the code a little harder and maybe more irritating.

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