Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In 3 operations how can I turn a byte into a 32 bit int that matches this:

0x1fffe

I can only explicitly access a byte at a time thus I start with 0xFF and then shift it.

I can do it using 4 operations but I cant find a way to eliminate one operation.

    int mask2 = 0xFF << 8;
    mask2 = mask2 | 0xFE;
    mask2 = mask2 + mask2;
    mask2 = mask2 | 0x02;

Any ideas?

In other words, I need a mask, 0x1FFFE to be made in 3 operations while only accessing a byte at a time like the example.

share|improve this question
    
It's not very clear what you're trying to achieve (in particular, your constraints), I see three bytes being used here, not counting the other two integer literals... –  Matteo Italia Sep 7 '11 at 22:26
    
I turn a byte, 0xFF into a 32 bit int, 0x001FFFFE in 4 operators. How can I do it in 3 using the same restrictions? –  Peter Sep 7 '11 at 22:27
    
You are using 3 different bytes as operands... 0xff, 0xfe, 0x02. –  Matteo Italia Sep 7 '11 at 22:30
    
what operations are you restricted to? i.e., why can't you just do (byte & 0x0) | 0x1fffe (2 bitwise operations) –  evil otto Sep 7 '11 at 22:30
    
How about ((0xff) & 0) | 0x1ffffe? Probably cheating right? –  asveikau Sep 7 '11 at 22:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Maybe this is what you want... you start with one single byte value (0xff), and you work on it with 3 bitwise operations, obtaining 0x1fffe.

int in = 0xff;
int out = in<<9 | in<<1;
share|improve this answer
    
Duh! Thank you that makes perfect sense! –  Peter Sep 7 '11 at 22:37

shift, add, shift, that's three operations, right?

((0xff << 8) + 0xff) << 1

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but I'd change that + with a | to make it use only bitwise operations. –  Matteo Italia Sep 7 '11 at 22:38

with two operations:

res = (1 << 17) - 2
share|improve this answer
    
(1<<17)-2 is shorter –  Omri Barel Sep 7 '11 at 22:38
    
hehe yes, just realized that :) –  duedl0r Sep 7 '11 at 22:39
int mask2 = 0xFF;
mask2 |= mask2 << 8;
mask2 += mask2;
share|improve this answer

How about this:

((~0xffU) >> 11) - 1

This assumes 32-bit integers...

Maybe that's better expressed as:

uint32_t x = 0xff;

x = ~x;
x >>= 11;
x -= 1;
share|improve this answer
    
My 64-bit machine doesn't like that... –  Omri Barel Sep 7 '11 at 22:42
    
@Omri - Yeah, I was realizing as I wrote it out that my first example assumes int is 32-bit. It also has issues due to 0xff being signed. I fixed it, and provided an example that explicitly used uint32_t. –  asveikau Sep 7 '11 at 22:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.