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I have a JSF2/Richfaces 4 project in which I want to use one of the default skins, BUT I also want to set some things' style using my own custom style sheet. This sounds pretty straightforward, but what I am finding is that in at least some cases, my own style is not being used. To be explicit, here are my relevant web.xml context-params:

<context-param>
    <param-name>org.richfaces.skin</param-name>
    <param-value>blueSky</param-value>
</context-param>
<context-param>
    <param-name>org.richfaces.control_skinning</param-name>
    <param-value>enable</param-value>
</context-param>
<context-param>
    <param-name>org.richfaces.control_skinning_classes</param-name>
    <param-value>enable</param-value>
</context-param>

My CSS file inclusion:

<h:outputStylesheet name="jsp-css.css" library="css" />

One such actual style definition:

.obsOptBtnSel{
background-color: transparent;
background-image: url('/images/circleY.gif');
background-repeat: no-repeat;
background-position: center;
border: none;
text-align: center;
width: 2em;
height: 2em;
}

And the actual button using the style:

<h:commandButton
value="?"
styleClass="#{obs.observation.observationExtent == -1.0 ? 'obsOptBtnSel' : 'obsOptBtnUns'}"
id="unknownButton"
/>

So, one would think that I'd inherit the styles from the blueSky skin where relevant, and then since I'm specifying a style class, any properties mentioned in the custom style sheet would be overridden.

But instead, when I look at the element in Firebug, I see my styleClass getting overridden by that specified by the skin, e.g. it keeps using the blueSky background image instead of mine.

I know I could fix this by simply putting !important after all my styling in the stylesheet, but that seems like a really crappy and unnecessary way to deal with this problem.

What am I doing wrong here? Is there another solution?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 13 down vote accepted

RichFaces has already a default background specified on the input[type=submit] CSS selector which is a stronger selector than .obsOptBtnSel. There are basically 2 options:

  1. Rename your selector to input[type=submit].obsOptBtnSel to make it yet stronger.

    input[type=submit].obsOptBtnSel {
        background-color: transparent;
        background-image: url('/images/circleY.gif');
        background-repeat: no-repeat;
        background-position: center;
        border: none;
        text-align: center;
        width: 2em;
        height: 2em;
    }
    

    Note, those 4 background properties can be set as a background oneliner with the sub-properties in the order color image position repeat:

    background: transparent url('/images/circleY.gif') center no-repeat;
    
  2. Add !important to the background properties to override all non-!important properties on the same element set by other CSS selectors.

    .obsOptBtnSel {
        background-color: transparent !important;
        background-image: url('/images/circleY.gif') !important;
        background-repeat: no-repeat !important;
        background-position: center !important;
        border: none;
        text-align: center;
        width: 2em;
        height: 2em;
    }
    

    or, shorter,

    background: transparent url('/images/circleY.gif') center no-repeat !important;
    
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1  
Balus wins again! And I learned something new about CSS. I was under the impression that the more specific styling would always win out in an override scenario, but that is clearly not the case. Thanks! –  user470714 Sep 8 '11 at 0:54
    
You're welcome. To get a better understanding of CSS precedences, I think this article is a good read: vanseodesign.com/css/css-specificity-inheritance-cascaade –  BalusC Sep 8 '11 at 0:57
    
And is there a way to include our own css files after richfaces ones in the head ? At same CSS selector level, it could override richfaces ones... –  Anthony O. Jan 24 '12 at 15:16
2  
More specific CSS does win but the math on how CSS selectors work uses a specific group multiplier algorithm that can a little complex to understand at first. The !important declaration trumps otherwise. This must be used in moderation though as the more !important definitions, then everything becomes important and thus ... NOTHING is important at a certain point. –  Darrell Teague Mar 4 '13 at 19:28

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