Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there some way to render all the literal objects and the literal objects within them using mustache? Being a neophyte at this I wondered if the following would work...

var data2 = {};
data2["collector"]={"sname":"Collector", "lname":"Collector", "V":[11,12,13,14,15]};
data2["storage"]  ={"sname":"Storage",   "lname":"Storage",   "V":[21,22,23,24,25]};
data2["aux1"]     ={"sname":"Aux1",      "lname":"Loop High", "V":[31,32,33,34,35]};
data2["aux2"]     ={"sname":"Aux2",      "lname":"Loop Low",  "V":[41,42,43,44,45]};
data2["aux3"]     ={"sname":"Aux3",      "lname":"Aux3",      "V":[51,52,53,54,55]};
data2["aux4"]     ={"sname":"Aux4",      "lname":"Aux4",      "V":[61,62,63,64,65]};

var T2 = "<table border='1'>"               +
         "{{#.}}<tr>"                       +
              "{{#.}}"                      +
                  "<td>{{.}}</td>"          +
              "{{/.}}"                      +
              "</tr>"                       +
         "{{/.}}"                           +
         "</table>"

html = Mustache.to_html(T2, data2);

but of course it doesn't. I get

{{/.}}

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Seems like you could just make a recursive function for this - mustache is pretty static, but recursion is perfect for looking up all the nodes in a deep object.

Untested hypothetical code:

var data2 = {};
data2["collector"]={"sname":"Collector", "lname":"Collector", "V":[11,12,13,14,15]};
data2["storage"]  ={"sname":"Storage",   "lname":"Storage",   "V":[21,22,23,24,25]};
data2["aux1"]     ={"sname":"Aux1",      "lname":"Loop High", "V":[31,32,33,34,35]};
data2["aux2"]     ={"sname":"Aux2",      "lname":"Loop Low",  "V":[41,42,43,44,45]};
data2["aux3"]     ={"sname":"Aux3",      "lname":"Aux3",      "V":[51,52,53,54,55]};
data2["aux4"]     ={"sname":"Aux4",      "lname":"Aux4",      "V":[61,62,63,64,65]};

var getMustache = function(data, wrap, all, depth){
    var r = "";
    var depth = depth || 0;
    for(var d in data){
        if(data.hasOwnProperty(d)){
            r += "<" + wrap[depth] || all + ">";
            if(data[d].length){
                r += "{{#" + d + "}}";
                r += getMustache(data[d], wrap, all, depth ++);
                r += "{{/" + d + "}}";
            } else {
                r += "{{" + data[d] + "}}";
            }
            r += "</" + wrap[depth] || all + ">";
        }
    }
    return r;
}

var T2 = "<table border='1'>" + getMustache(data2,['tr','td'],'span');

html = Mustache.to_html(T2, data2);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I've tried this and there are some problems. I think the line "if(data[d].length()){" fails because data[d] is not a string but a literal object. –  Mike D Sep 8 '11 at 1:40
    
I think you are trying to find out of data[d] is a literal object or not. –  Mike D Sep 8 '11 at 2:00
    
Jesse: I do thanks you for this response. I don't understand why the above iterates over the literals and arrays and also explicitly names them; it seems it should iterate and use {{.}} or name them but not both. I've tried to fix thing up with limited success so far. If I get it to work I'll post it here. I think the if(data[d].length().. should be if(typeof data[d] =="object") –  Mike D Sep 8 '11 at 13:58
    
whoops, length isn't a method, it's a property - so data[d].length should be there instead - sorry, I didn't test this at all :P –  Jesse Sep 12 '11 at 22:48

Since the goal was to use mustache, here's the final deal using mustache to expand the array. I don't know if Jesse meant to put embedded literal objects in tables within table or not but that was not my goal. I deleted wrap and all from the function in this version as I either didn't need them or understand why they were there. I remain indebted to Jesse for this hint; I doubt I would have come up with anything so clever.

var getMustache = function(data, depth)
{

  var r = "";

  if (depth == 0)
  {
    r=r+"<tr>";
  }

  for(var d in data)
  {
    if(data.hasOwnProperty(d))
    {
      if(typeof data[d] =="object")
      {
        if (data[d].length)      // is it an array?
        {
          var T = "{{#" + d + "}}<td>{{.}}</td>{{/" + d + "}}";
          r += Mustache.to_html(T, data);
        }
        else
        {
          r += getMustache(data[d], depth+1);
        }
      } 
      else 
      {
         r += "<td>" + data[d] + "</td>";
      }
    }
    if (depth == 0)
    {
      r=r+"</tr>";
    }
  }
  return r;
}

var T2 = "<table border='1'>" + getMustache(data2,0) + "</table>";

html = Mustache.to_html(T2, data2);

document.write(html);
share|improve this answer

The following works. It doesn't use mustache facilities at all. I plan to change it so that it uses mustache's iteration on the array.

var getMustache = function(data, wrap, all, depth)
{

  var r = "";

  if (depth == 0)
  {
    r=r+"<tr>";
  }

  for(var d in data)
  {
    if(data.hasOwnProperty(d))
    {
      if(typeof data[d] =="object")
      {
         r += getMustache(data[d], wrap, all, depth+1);
      } 
      else 
      {
         r += "<td>" + data[d] + "</td>";
      }
    }
    if (depth == 0)
    {
      r=r+"</tr>";
    }
  }

  //alert("r=" + r);

  return r;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You can determine if the var is an array by checking data[d].length after determining it's an object. But as far as using mustache to handle the array, a template would have to be constructed and used to expand the array. Since the jscript code is already there to handle that it hardly makes any sense to do so. It appears mustache isn't much help in constructing the html to turn this literal object into a table. :-( –  Mike D Sep 8 '11 at 15:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.