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I wrote a program that reverses each word in a string. For example hello and goodbye is turned into olleh dna eybdoog. My program works, however the time efficiency is o(n^2) and I probably could of written less code. I am trying not to use any of the string.functions() ( I used string.length() once). Any tips or suggestions would be appreciated.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
void breakString(string& me, char * otherOne, int len, int count);
void reverseString(char* s); 
 int main () {
string me=("hello and goodbye");
char * otherOne;
int len=0;
int count=0;

for (len; len<me.length()+1; len++){
    count++;
    if (me[len]=='\0') {
        otherOne=new char[count];
        len-=count-1;
        count=0;
        for (len; me[len]; len++){
            otherOne[count]=me[len];
            count++;
        }
        reverseString(otherOne);
        breakString( me, otherOne, len, count);
    }
    if (me[len]==' ' ) {
        otherOne=new char[count];
        len-=count-1;
        count=0;
for (len; me[len] != ' '; len++){
    otherOne[count]=me[len];
    count++;
}
reverseString(otherOne);
        breakString( me, otherOne, len, count);
        count=0;
        otherOne=NULL;
        delete[]otherOne;
    }

}
delete[]otherOne;
cout << me;
return 0;
}
void reverseString(char* s)  
{

int len =0;
char swap;
for (len=0; s[len] != '\0'; len++);

for ( int i=0; i<len/2; i++)
{

    swap = *(s+i);

    *(s+i)= *(s+len-i-1);

    *(s+len-i-1) = swap;


}
}


void breakString(string &me, char * otherOne, int len, int count){
len-=count;
for (count=0; otherOne[count]; count++){
    me[len]=otherOne[count];
    len++;
}
}   
share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of string reverse in C++ –  Paul Tomblin Sep 8 '11 at 1:05
1  
You realize that std::string has a reverse iterator, right? Why not just iterate from me.rebegin()? –  Paul Tomblin Sep 8 '11 at 1:07
2  
@Paul - Not a duplicate. That one reverses the entire string; Aaron's looking for a word-by-word reverser. –  Xavier Holt Sep 8 '11 at 1:08
    
The concepts are similar enough - all he has to do is get a pointer to the beginning and end of each word and reverse them in place using the code in the references question. –  Paul Tomblin Sep 8 '11 at 1:10
1  
This obviously homework, it should be tagged as such and refine your question. –  Ed S. Sep 8 '11 at 1:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Isn't far simple something like

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main () {
string me=("hello and goodbye");
int i,j, index=0;
char tmp;

for (i=0; i<me.length()+1; i++) 
    if (me[i] == ' ' || me[i] == '\0') {
        for(j=i-1;j>index;j--,index++) {
            tmp = me[index];
            me[index] = me[j];
            me[j] =tmp;
        }           
        index = i+1;
    }

cout << me;
return 0;
}

?

Complexity is O(n): each word is read twice (or, better, one and a half times): once since the program finds a space or a \0, then, in the nested for, the word is reversed. index indicates the word starting char.

share|improve this answer
    
Or just std::reverse(me.begin()+index, me.begin()+i); instead of the for loop. Plus or minus an out-by-one error on my indices there. –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '11 at 1:36
    
Thank you for the much shorter code. I guess mine would also be O(n) for the same reason –  Aaron Sep 8 '11 at 1:48
    
Each word is read twice, not one and half. When you swap you read the word a second time (except the middle character of words with an odd number of characters) and it is always written once (minus one character when odd length, again.) –  Alexis Wilke Jan 2 '12 at 2:44

You should be able to do this with a stack in between your input and output strings. The stack's useful to hold the current word, and it does the reversing for you, too. I'm not going to write the full code for it, but the algorithm is:

String output = ""
char Stack stack = []
while input.not_empty:
    char c = input.get_char
    if c == ' ':
        while stack.not_empty:
            output.put_char(stack.pop)
        output.put_char(c)
    else:
        stack.push(c)
while stack.not_empty:
    output.put_char(stack.pop)
return output

That'll give you O(n), and it's pretty easy to prove:

  • Each character is read once (O(1))
  • It's pushed onto the stack (at most) once (O(1))
  • It's popped off the stack at most once (O(1))
  • It's written once (O(1))

So: 4 * n * O(1), which is O(n).

Hope this helps!

PS: If this is homework, people are more likely to help you if you tag it as such.

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