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I'm trying to get a number as CLI input from python. Valid input should be either an int or a float and I need to maintain type. So validating an int and returning a float wouldn't work.

This is the best thing I've been able to come up with and it's not all that good.

def is_valid(n):
    try:
        if '.' in n: return float(n)
        return int(n)
    except ValueError:
        print "try again"

def num_input(s):
    n = raw_input(s)
    while is_valid(n) is None:
        n = raw_input(s)
    return is_valid(n)

valid_num = num_input("Enter a valid number: ")

Clearly this isn't the best way.

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3  
While you will probably receive several suggestions about how to tweak this code and make it slightly more Pythonic, I actually think the approach is sound — I am not sure why it is clear to you that this is not, in fact, roughly the best way. :) –  Brandon Rhodes Sep 8 '11 at 1:13
    
This wont work for "1e3" for example. float("1e3") works, but int("1e3") doesn't –  gnibbler Sep 8 '11 at 1:59
    
@Brandon - b/c it's a lot of python code to get something so simple done and checking for the dot just felt wrong. –  Finn Sep 8 '11 at 19:33

5 Answers 5

use a for loop to try all the conversions, I added complex type for demonstration:

def is_valid(n):
    for t in (int, float, complex):
        try:
            return t(n)
        except ValueError:
            pass
    raise ValueError("invalid number %s" % n)

print is_valid("10")
print is_valid("10.0")
print is_valid("1+3.0j")
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1  
this would always return, say, 1.2 as an int ! –  wim Sep 8 '11 at 1:51
    
int("1.2") raise ValueError, int(1.2) return 1. in this case, n is a string input by raw_input. –  HYRY Sep 8 '11 at 1:55
    
oh, excuse me. you're correct. it's an awkward interface though, i would expect a function called is_valid to return a bool, not the converted number itself. and i would not usually expect an argument called n to be a string. –  wim Sep 8 '11 at 2:06
    
This doesn't really answer the question; however, looping over the types in an order seems reasonable, to the point of obvious correctness. Is the idea of stacking types in order like this something fundamental in CS/Math type systems / number theory? –  Finn Sep 8 '11 at 2:30
def num_input(prompt, error):
    while True:
        result = raw_input(prompt)
        for candidate in (int, float):
            try: return candidate(result)
            except ValueError: pass
        print error
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Try using the decimal module which will allow you to maintain exactly the precision of the entered number eg:

import decimal

def num_input(s):
    while True:
        try:
            return decimal.Decimal(raw_input(s))
        except decimal.InvalidOperation, e:
            print e.message


valid_num = num_input("Enter a decimal number: ")

print 'ANSWER: ', valid_num

See: http://docs.python.org/library/decimal.html

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

After considering the early answers and thinking about it a bit more the solution I came up with is:

def num_input(prompt, error):
    s = raw_input(prompt)
    for t in (int, float, complex):
        try: return t(s)
        except ValueError: pass
    print error
    return num_input(prompt, error) #better get it in the first 1k tries

I really want an input function not just a validation function; however, I think HYRY's suggestion to loop over int, float, complex is a good one. I took win's suggestion to use recursion instead of looping, understanding that a really confused and persistent user could exceed the max recursion depth. Although I don't need it now, I think Karl Knechtel is correct in making the error an arg instead of hard coded.

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Your method is okay, it just needs a little polish!

def num_input(prompt):
  str_ = raw_input(prompt)
  try:
    n = float(str_) if '.' in str_ else int(str_)
  except ValueError:
    n = num_input(prompt)
  return n

valid_num = num_input("Enter a valid number: ")
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the suggestion. Recursion is much more obvious than the while loop. –  Finn Sep 8 '11 at 2:38

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