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I'm messing about with Java, after a long hiatus, and I'm running into my usual problems with its complexity.

I have what should be a simple problem, but what with InputStreams, InputReaders, and dealing with finally and close(), I'm not seeing an obvious answer.

I'm in the main() function of a simple command-line app. I've parsed my command-line, and I have a input filename. This contains either the path to a text file or "-", which means that the program should read from System.in.

What I want is a String containing the contents of the file (or the remaining contents of System.in). And what I am ending up with is way too complex, so I'm looking for the simple way to do it.

Question 1: Given an InputStream (which might be System.in or it might be a FileInputStream() I opened myself, what's the simplest way to read all of its contents into a String? The various readAll() methods I've been seeing returned byte arrays, for which there is a place, but it's not what I am looking for.

Question 2: What is the usual idiom for making sure that any reader I open will always be closed?

If I were writing in C++, I'd have put the close() in my class's destructor, and I'd be sure that close() would be called when my object fell out of scope.

If I were writing in C#, I'd have used a "using" block, and I'd have the same guarantee.

I'm sure this can be done in Java, but my attempts so far have seemed cumbersome.

If I try:

try
{
    InputStream inStream = new InputStream(...);
}
finally
{
    inStream.close();
}

I get complains that "inStream cannot be resolved".

But if I try

InputStream inStream = null;
try
{
    inStream = new InputStream(...);
}
finally
{
    if (inStream != null)
        inStream.close();
}

I get "Unhandled exception type IOException.

So now I'm at:

InputStream inStream = null;
try
{
    inStream = new InputStream(...);
}
finally
{
    try
    {
        if (inStream != null)
            inStream.close();
    }
    catch (IOException ex)
    {
    }
}

And that just seems ludicrous.

What is the usual pattern?

share|improve this question
    
what is the unhandled exception in case 2? –  Daniel A. White Sep 8 '11 at 1:09
    
@Daniel, close can throw IOException. –  Henning Makholm Sep 8 '11 at 1:11
    
Java is pretty ludicrous :( Have a look at Google Guava; the com.google.common.io package in particular. Files#readLines and Closeables#closeQuietly in particular might help you here. Apache Commons IO probably has something not dissimilar. –  Huw Sep 8 '11 at 1:17
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You might want to try using Apache Commons IO to wrap some of this stuff for you. An example:

import org.apache.commons.io.FileUtils;

File f = new File("mystuff.txt");
String contents = FileUtils.readFileToString(f);

Or, if you're starting with a stream:

import org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils;

InputStream is = new InputStream(...);
String contents = IOUtils.toString(is);

And much, much more :-).

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I would have said :-) –  SingleShot Sep 8 '11 at 1:17
    
I'm not starting with a File, I'm starting with an InputStream. Or I might be, if the user chooses to use stdin. I suppose I could put in separate handling for System.in and for passed filenames, but that sorta bugs me... –  Jeff Dege Sep 8 '11 at 1:19
    
String contents = IOUtils.toString(inStream); –  Matt Solnit Sep 8 '11 at 1:21
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I'd use

InputStream in = ...;
String content = IOUtils.toString(in);
IOUtils.closeQuietly(in);

That's IOUtils.toString() and IOUtils.closeQuietly() from Commons IO.

share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the best choice, of what I've seen so far. –  Jeff Dege Sep 8 '11 at 1:27
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I would normally do something like the following: (NOTE: I haven't shown how inStream gets it contents.)

    InputStream inStream = null;
    BufferedReader in = null;

    try {
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        in = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(inStream));
        String str;
        while ((str = in.readLine()) != null) {
            builder.append(str).append("\n");
        }
    }
    catch(Exception e) {

    }
    finally {
        if(in != null) {
            try {
                in.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {}
        }
        if(inStream != null) {
            try {
                inStream.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {}
        }
    }

As for your complaint about exception handling, it makes sense. If something fails you may or may not want to know. Its giving you the option of how you want to deal with it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not complaining about the existence of exception handling, I'm complaining about the necessity of having one set of exception handlers for the open() and read(), and then another set of exception handlers for the close(). –  Jeff Dege Sep 8 '11 at 1:23
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Upgrade to Java 7, then you'll be able to benefit from automatic resource management (the try-with-resources statement):

try (InputStream inStream = new InputStream(...)) {
   // ...
}

This is borrowed from C#'s using statement.

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If you have the ability to use Groovy, it's a lot easier:

def file = new File('/my/path/test.txt')
def contents = file.getText()

Groovy will allow you to drop into any Java methods you need for those cases where complexity is required and it compiles to Java files so works well with existing classes.

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