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Pixel Perfect https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/pixel-perfect/
Is not working any more on FF6 and seams that they will not update it, is there any existing add on or way to do the same thing this add on was doing?

About this Add-on

By toggling the composition on and off, the developer can visually see how many pixels they are off in development.

Pixel Perfect also has an opacity option so that you can view the HTML below the composition. By being able to see both the composition and the HTML you can now simultaneously use Firebug while Pixel Perfect is still in action.

  • Requires Firebug
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6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

For Google Chrome try "PerfectPixel by WellDoneCode" extension: https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/dkaagdgjmgdmbnecmcefdhjekcoceebi

IMHO it's the best PP analogue in Chrome Web Store

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As an alternative one can use the bookmarklet http://dsheiko.github.io/pixel-perfect-bookmarklet/

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I think this app can be useful: http://pxper.com/en/

It can draw guide lines over all programs and windows.

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It is not the same as the Pixel Perfect, but seams a helpful tool is some simple tasks, thanks –  Amr ElGarhy Feb 1 at 14:35

This is a chrome extention https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/1px/gebccnmciopflhcdihopmphapifkkfdh which works well

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Yes, there is an alternative, and it's cross browser and future proof:

body {
  background-image: url(design.jpg);
  background-repeat: no-repeat;
  background-position: top center; /* adjust to whatever you like. */
  opacity: 0.6; /* see through the page */
}

Granted, a plugin such as PixelPerfect is nice, but if you run into bugs or other issues with it, then it's not worth it.

Alternatively, you can do something such as this: Install "Power Menu" (on Windows) or equivalent software. Power Menu lets you change the opacity of OS windows. Now open the comp in your image preview software, reduce opacity of the window, and drag on top of your browser.

This might not answer the question directly, but I'm pointing out alternative solutions which do not involve browser plugins, which may have been overlooked.

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I've was using this - https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/olfihdjffmgfmmcdodcgciejhnhibalg#

It's ok, did what it was supposed to do without too many bugs.

I uninstalled when I noticed that it can access 'All data on your computer and the websites you visit'.

I don't know enough about chrome plugins to see why this would be necessary. Any idea if I'm just being paranoid?


Edit - adding alternatives

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/ginhbdfcoiigpedgaidclojolemiincd

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/ealmmafhdlpgegmalecokhkhpbbdboei

These all say that they can access all data on sites you visit. Still unsure why this is needed.

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I don't think there's a way to configure access on a per-page basis? Clearly they need access on the page they're doing the overlay on... –  Kevin Oct 1 '12 at 19:01

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