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I am using Visual C# 2010 and am having problems setting registry keys. I assumed this was to do with the fact that I wasn't running it as admin at first but i have tried building the Release and then right clicking the exe and selecting 'run as administrator' to no avail.

I also tried using the RegistryPermission class which didn't seem to make any difference.

Here is the code:

RegistryKey rkey = Registry.LocalMachine;
// RegistryPermission f = new RegistryPermission(
//    RegistryPermissionAccess.Write | RegistryPermissionAccess.Read,
 //   @"HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Company\Product");


/**********************/
/* set registry keys  */
/**********************/
RegistryKey wtaKey = rkey.OpenSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Company\Product", true);
try
{
    wtaKey.SetValue("key1", 123);
    wtaKey.SetValue("key2", 567);
    wtaKey.SetValue("key3", textbox.Text);
    wtaKey.SetValue("key4", "some string");
}
catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
{
    MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    return;
}

This gives me the error message from the exception each time I run it, even with 'run as administrator'. Any ideas how I can get around this? It seems strange because my standard user account allows me to go into regedit and manually change these values no problem.

share|improve this question
    
Unless you've set your UAC to not warn, then opening Regedit should get you a UAC dialog to confirm. You do need administrative access, because you're editing HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE keys, and those require full privileges –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 8 '11 at 2:32

1 Answer 1

This works :)

First:

You should be using CreateSubKey rather than OpenSubKey.

Second:

It was not an administrative issue that you were experiencing, rather, you simply needed to add another "\" to the end of your registry path.

 private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
 {
     RegistryKey rkey = Registry.LocalMachine;
     RegistryPermission f = new RegistryPermission(
     RegistryPermissionAccess.Write | RegistryPermissionAccess.Read,
         @"HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Company\Product");

     /**********************/
     /* set registry keys  */
     /**********************/
     RegistryKey wtaKey = rkey.CreateSubKey(@"SOFTWARE\Company\Product\");
     try
     {
         wtaKey.SetValue("key1", 123);
         wtaKey.SetValue("key2", 567);
         wtaKey.SetValue("key4", "some string");
     }
     catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
     {
         MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
         return;
     }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
Are you certain it works? I think it's probably creating keys in the registry virtualization subtree, not the actual subtree. –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 8 '11 at 2:37
    
It worked for me - It created the exact keys that he was looking to create. So, yes I'm sure it works. –  user725913 Sep 8 '11 at 2:38
    
If you define "works" as writing to the entirely wrong registry tree. Yes, it will complete without error. You're "creating" the key, not opening it like the original author. Windows has a feature that "virtualizes" the registry so badly behaving apps like this will seem to "work" –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 8 '11 at 2:40
    
It does exactly what i interpreted whatever it was that the op was looking for it to do. It made four three keys "key1", "key2", "key3" under Product. I will upload an image of what it did to my registry if that helps? –  user725913 Sep 8 '11 at 2:42
    
Read this to find out why it "seems" to work msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa965884(v=vs.85).aspx –  Erik Funkenbusch Sep 8 '11 at 2:44

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