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  var kids = [{}];
  i = 0;
  while (i++ !== count) {
    child = {
      value: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100),
      children: addChildren(Math.floor(Math.random() * 10))
    };
    kids.push(child);
    console.log( kids );
  }

The problem with this is the kids object has an empty first element. How can I circumvent it? If I don't declare it as a JSON object, I can't access the push element.

Thanks

share|improve this question
3  
Where does the JSON part come in? And push is a method on Javascript arrays, not on Javascript objects. –  Cheeso Sep 8 '11 at 3:24
2  
+1 to Cheeso. "JSON" is such an overused term. In fact the only proper use of the term "JSON object" is when referring to the object JSON in ECMAScript 5. IMHO the proper thing to say for what most people mean would be "JSON string". –  Ray Toal Sep 8 '11 at 3:32
4  
A kitten dies every time somebody says "JSON object" or has a variable called "json" that contains parsed data. –  Ates Goral Sep 8 '11 at 3:49
    
"The problem with this is the kids object has an empty first element." - kids is an array, and if you don't want the first element to be an empty object why on earth are you putting an empty object there? Please rephrase your question to make it clearer what you are trying to do. Give a concrete example of your desired output. You don't seem to understand the difference between an array and an object (and as the others pointed out you don't seem to know what JSON is either). Help us to help you... –  nnnnnn Sep 8 '11 at 4:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Just declare kids as an empty array:

var kids = [];
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1  
Sounds like he wants to encode it as JSON, which means he needs an array inside a JavaScript object. –  Jergason Sep 8 '11 at 3:22
3  
An Array is a valid JSON object. Just look at json.org –  Chris Pietschmann Sep 8 '11 at 3:27
    
Chris is correct (+1): jsfiddle.net/jGx84 –  Ray Toal Sep 8 '11 at 4:22
    
Chris is correct (+1) except that in his comment he just killed another kitten (as per Ates Goral's comment above). As for what Shamoon (OP) wants, I don't think he or she has managed to explain that yet. –  nnnnnn Sep 8 '11 at 4:28
    
@nnnnnn I know! Poor kitten! –  Ray Toal Sep 8 '11 at 4:36

It sounds like you want to end up with a JavaScript object containing several instances of objects that have two keys value and children. It would seem an array is the best choice (which Khnle's and Chris's answers give you):

[{"value":2,"children":3}, {"value":12,"children":9}, {"value":20,"children":13}]

In your comment to one of the answers, however, you said that you did not want an array. One way to do this is to wrap it, as in Jergason's answer:

{
    "children": [
        {"value":2,"children":3}, 
        {"value":12,"children":9}, 
        {"value":20,"children":13}
    ]
}

Your question seemed to say that you like arrays because you get the push operation, but you would like to avoid them completely. The only way to avoid arrays completely is to tag each object with its own unique key. If indeed this is what you want, it would look like this:

{
    "child0":{"value":2,"children":3}, 
    "child1":{"value":12,"children":9}, 
    "child2":{"value":20,"children":13}
}

This is not hard to do; just replace kids.push(child) with kids["child" + i] = child.

Make sure this is really what you want, though, because this collection of children really seems to scream "array"! :-)

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This should be the correct answer! –  Paulo Fidalgo Dec 17 '13 at 14:41

You could just have your object contain an empty array.

var obj = { "children": [] };
// Your looping code here
obj.children.push(child);
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if this will work. This will make my key children, but I'll lose value, won't I? –  Shamoon Sep 8 '11 at 3:25
    
Nope. You would get at the child object by doing obj.children[0] and could access the children or the value by obj.children[0].children or obj.children[0].value –  Jergason Sep 8 '11 at 13:33

With some slight changes (add var for local variable):

var kids = []; //Note this line
var i = 0; //index counter most likely needs to be local
while (i++ !== count) {
    var child = {
       value: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100),
       children: addChildren(Math.floor(Math.random() * 10))
    };
    kids.push(child);
    console.log(kids);
 }

I think that's what you would want.

Update: Your requirement is rather odd. You can do this:

 var kids = [{}]; //Note this line
 delete kids[0];
 var i = 0; //index counter most likely needs to be local
 while (i++ !== count) {
    var child = {
       value: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100),
       children: addChildren(Math.floor(Math.random() * 10))
    };
    kids.push(child);
    console.log(kids);
 }

or

 var kids = [{
       value: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100),
       children: addChildren(Math.floor(Math.random() * 10))
 }];
 var i = 1; //1 less iteration than previous
 while (i++ !== count) {
    var child = {
       value: Math.floor(Math.random() * 100),
       children: addChildren(Math.floor(Math.random() * 10))
    };
    kids.push(child);
    console.log(kids);
 }

That would satisfy your requirement, but what I show originally is still, I think, what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
That makes kids an array. I need it to be JSON all the way through –  Shamoon Sep 8 '11 at 3:28

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