Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C++ script which involves string representations of would-be hexadecimal numbers. In a later portion of the script, I would like to convert these would-be hexadecimal numbers into doubles for some arithmetic in base 10. To try to make this conversion, I use a function.

double MyFunction(string input)
{
double Number;
stringstream ss(input);
ss >> hex >> Number;
return Number;
}

When my script runs, it seems the resulting converted string is only considered as a decimal number. If the original string was "fc" or "b5", it says the converted number is -9.25596e+061. But if the string was "33" (which is supposed to be 0x33), it views it as decimal 33. I have tried it without the ">> hex" and with adding a "0x" prefix to the string before conversion (since the compile seems to understand 0xF just as it would 16), but no such luck.

I understand the computer stores everything as binary and that the base a number is viewed at is not stored, but I simply do not understand what is wrong here. Why does it seemingly insist upon reading the string in base 10 and disregarding any instance of A-F?

Any help will be appreciated.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The hex manipulator only works for integral types like int. First input the hexadecimal string into an integer and then convert that to a double:

double MyFunction(string input)
{
    int Number; // Notice now Number is an integer
    stringstream ss(input);
    ss >> hex >> Number; 
    return Number; // This should convert Number to a double via promotion
}
share|improve this answer
    
That worked! Thank you so much, James! –  anon Sep 8 '11 at 4:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.