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I have 3 sets in Linq, like this:

struct Index 
{
    string code;
    int indexValue;
}

List<Index> reviews
List<Index> products
List<Index> pages

These lists have different code.

I want to merge these sets as following:

  • Take the first in reviews
  • Take the first in products
  • Take the first in pages
  • Take the second in reviews -... and so on, note that these lists are not same-size.

How can I do this in Linq?

EDIT: Wait, is there a change to do this without .NET 4.0?

Thank you very much

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3  
are all 3 lists the same size? if so, I think you're looking for the Zip method in linq community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2008/11/03/… –  BlackTigerX Sep 8 '11 at 4:15
    
There's also the union method, but not sure what you're after –  BlackTigerX Sep 8 '11 at 4:16
    
Where are you gonna store the new objects, and can you elaborate little bit merging you mean? –  Tarik Sep 8 '11 at 4:16
1  
What if those classes Review, Product and Page have nothing in common, what do you expect the result to contain. I can see if they contain some overlapped members, then there might be reason that you want the first in each list to be merged. –  Khnle - Kevin Le Sep 8 '11 at 4:17
    
Is there are equal items in every List<> ? –  Abhishek Bhalani Sep 8 '11 at 4:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could use Zip to do your bidding.

var trios = reviews
    .Zip(products, (r, p) => new { Review = r, Product = p })
    .Zip(pages, (rp, p) => new { rp.Review, rp.Product, Page = p });

Edit:

For .NET 3.5, it's possible to implement Zip quite easily: but there are a few gotcha s. Jon Skeet has a great post series on how to implement LINQ to objects operators (for educational purposes), including this post, on Zip. The source code of the whole series, edulinq, can be found on Google Code.

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is there a change to do this without .NET 4.0, thanks :) –  Vimvq1987 Sep 8 '11 at 5:47
1  
Bart De Smet has a blog post about just that: community.bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2008/11/03/… –  Bryan Menard Sep 8 '11 at 5:53
    
I updated the answer, can you please give a look? :) –  Vimvq1987 Sep 8 '11 at 6:08

The simple answer

To merge them into a common list without any common data, using the order they appear this, you can use the Zip method:

var rows = reviews
    .Zip(products, (r, p) => new { Review = r, Product = p })
    .Zip(pages, (rp, page) => new { rp.Review, rp.Product, Page = page });

The problem with this solution is that the lists must be identical length, or your result will be chopped to the shortest list of those original three.

Edit:

If you can't use .Net 4, check out Jon Skeet's blog posts on a clean-room implementation of Linq and His article on Zip in particular.

If you're using .Net 2, then try his library (possibly) or try LinqBridge

How to deal with different-lengthed lists

You can pre-pad the list to the desired length. I couldn't find an existing method to do this, so I'd use an extension method:

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Pad<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
        int desiredCount, T padWith = default(T))
    {
        // Note: Not using source.Count() to avoid double-enumeration
        int counter = 0;
        var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();

        while(counter < desiredCount)
        {
            yield return enumerator.MoveNext()
                ? enumerator.Current
                : padWith;
            ++counter;
        }
    }
}

You can use it like this:

var paddedReviews = reviews.Pad(desiredLength);
var paddedProducts = products.Pad(desiredLength,
    new Product { Value2 = DateTime.Now }
    );

Full compiling sample and corresponding output

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;

class Review
{
    public string Value1;
}

class Product
{
    public DateTime Value2;
}

class Page
{
    public int Value3;
}

public static class EnumerableExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<T> Pad<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source,
        int desiredCount, T padWith = default(T))
    {
        int counter = 0;
        var enumerator = source.GetEnumerator();

        while(counter < desiredCount)
        {
            yield return enumerator.MoveNext()
                ? enumerator.Current
                : padWith;
            ++counter;
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var reviews = new List<Review>
        {
            new Review { Value1 = "123" },
            new Review { Value1 = "456" },
            new Review { Value1 = "789" },
        };
        var products = new List<Product>()
        {
            new Product { Value2 = DateTime.Now },
            new Product { Value2 = DateTime.Now.Subtract(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5)) },
        };
        var pages = new List<Page>()
        {
            new Page { Value3 = 123 },
        };

        int maxCount = Math.Max(Math.Max(reviews.Count, products.Count), pages.Count);

        var rows = reviews.Pad(maxCount)
            .Zip(products.Pad(maxCount), (r, p) => new { Review = r, Product = p })
            .Zip(pages.Pad(maxCount), (rp, page) => new { rp.Review, rp.Product, Page = page });

        foreach (var row in rows)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} - {1} - {2}"
                , row.Review != null ? row.Review.Value1 : "(null)"
                , row.Product != null ? row.Product.Value2.ToString() : "(null)"
                , row.Page != null ? row.Page.Value3.ToString() : "(null)"
                );
        }
    }
}

123 - 9/7/2011 10:02:22 PM - 123
456 - 9/7/2011 10:02:17 PM - (null)
789 - (null) - (null)

On use of the Join tag

This operation isn't a logical Join. This is because you're matching on index, not on any data out of each object. Each object would have to have other data in common (besides their position in the lists) to be joined in the sense of a Join that you would find in a relational database.

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If you tried this in a DB (without cheating and using the row index), you'd get 27 rows returned, including every possible combination of the values from each list. This is called a "cartesian join" or "cartesian product". See: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relational_database#Relational_operations –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 8 '11 at 4:36

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