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I'm trying to keep myself from having a very long code block inside an if statement, so I'm trying to call another function into the current scope:

var f = function(){ alert(a); };

(function(){
    var a = "abc.";
    f(); //undefined
    eval("("+f+")()"); //this works, but eval is evil
})();

I'm probably missing something very basic about scopes, or even other (better) ways to approach the whole thing, but I can't figure out whatever it is. Any ideas on how to do this? I don't want to pass in the variables I need through function arguments.

Thanks in advance!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you don't want to pass the required variables as parameters you need to make sure the function you are calling is at the same scope (or lower) than where those variables are defined.

So in your case if you bring the var f = ... definition inside the immediately-executed function in parentheses it will be in the same scope as variable a. I'm not sure how that fits with the if statement that you mention but don't include in your code sample, but you can do something like this:

(function(){
  var f = function(){ alert(a); };

  // other code here if you have any
  var a;

  if ("your if condition" == "something") {
    a = "abc.";
    f();
  }
})();

Or just declare a in the same place you declare f.

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+1 because that's probably the best way to do it - put the variable on the scope chain without making it global. –  RobG Sep 8 '11 at 5:31

You need to make sure you are passing the variable that you want to alert to the function

var f = function(a){ alert(a); };

(function(){
    var a = "abc.";
    f(a); //passing it the reference to a
})();

Edit: Well if you really dont want to pass a variable. You need to first set a in global scope. When using var within a function, you are creating a variable that is local to that function. leave the var out and you are just updating the global version of it.

var f = function(){ alert(a); };
var a = ""; // declare a in global scope

(function(){
    a = "abc."; // dont use var, we just update the global scope.
    f(); // F runs and grabs a from global scope
})();
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+1 evil twin!!! –  Joseph Silber Sep 8 '11 at 4:54
1  
hrm, well why Not? Thats how programming works.. –  Wes Sep 8 '11 at 4:58
1  
Updated my answer, but please dont do this, suuuuuch a headache once your code gets bigger. –  Wes Sep 8 '11 at 5:02
1  
You're right, leaving out var alltogether would just throw it in global scope, but that is super bad practice. Always declare your variables within the scope that they intend to live. –  Wes Sep 8 '11 at 5:10
1  
@evan - declaring a isn't superfluous. If a isn't declared, then calling f() before the line assiging to a in the anonymous function has run will throw a reference error. Assigning a value to a in the declaration is superfluous. –  RobG Sep 8 '11 at 5:35

you can set the scope of a function with .apply() or .call() but that won't work for what you're trying to do.

If you declare a before you declare f (just declare, you don't need to assign anything to it) you can just do f(); inline as you're doing in the example, and it will work.

var a, f = function(){ alert(a); };

(function(){
    a = "abc.";
    f(); //not undefined!
})();
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1  
Apply and call have nothing to do with scope (absolutely nothing). They set a function's this keyword to a particular object, that's it. –  RobG Sep 8 '11 at 5:30

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