Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to do something like this:

public string DoSomething(Expression<Func<int>> expression)
{
    //...
}

public void CallDoSomething()
{
    var myObj = new MyType();
    var result = DoSomething(() => myObj.IntProperty);
}

The goal is to do these three things within "DoSomething()": 1) Get a reference to myObj and do something with it 2) Get the name and value of the property "IntProperty" 3) Restrict myObj to be only of type MyType

I can do 1 and 2, but I cannot figure out how to do 3!

Please help.

Cheers

share|improve this question
1  
I haven't found a solution, but for now I'm just adding a line of code to DoSomething which basically says if (myObj.GetType() != typeof(MyType))... –  Chaos Sep 8 '11 at 6:06
    
That would be a solution... –  Ed S. Sep 8 '11 at 6:35

3 Answers 3

You can use the OfType<T>() method?

share|improve this answer
    
Not without an IEnumerable<T> –  saus Sep 8 '11 at 11:46
public static string DoSomething(Expression<Func<int>> expression) 
{
    MemberExpression memberExpression = (MemberExpression)expression.Body;
    Type type = memberExpression.Member.ReflectedType; // MyType

    bool check = typeof(MyType).IsAssignableFrom(type); // So you could check for base class
    // If you want to check for exactly one class, do 
    // bool type == typeof(MyType);

    if (!check) 
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }

    return null;
}

Is this what you want?

share|improve this answer
    
It's sort of what I am already using as a solution, but I think you handled the check better than I did (I used .GetType() ==). What I wanted was a method that allows compile time check safetely. –  Chaos Sep 13 '11 at 4:31

What you're doing is ... odd, and I don't know why the GetType solution isn't acceptable, but you could probably achieve something similar with another layer:

public string DoSomething(Expression<Func<int>> expression)
{
    //...
}

public void CallDoSomething()
{
    var myObj = new MyType();
    var result = CallHelper(myObj);
}

private string CallHelper(MyType m)
{
    return DoSomething(() => m.IntProperty);
}

CallHelper enforces the type restriction for you. I don't think there's any way to do it directly in the lambda expression (at least not without changing the signature of DoSomething), but maybe I'm missing something.

share|improve this answer
    
Changing the signature of DoSomething is completely okay. But I'm just not sure how to solve this particular problem just by changing the signature. –  Chaos Sep 13 '11 at 4:33
    
Maybe DoSomething(T obj, Expression<Func<int>> exp) where T : MyType {}. The call would look like DoSomething(myObj, () => myObj.IntProperty); The down side is that there is no gaurentee that the lambda expression is based on MyType or is even the same object as the first parameter. –  Chaos Sep 13 '11 at 4:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.