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My query is SELECT * FROM PMT_PROJECT WHERE PROJECT_CODE LIKE '%A3\7\2011%' AND COMPANY_ID=14. PROJECT_CODE column contains the exact match record but, my above query is unable to fetch the record from MySql db. please do correct my like syntax regarding \ special character, if mistake in above query or else suggest me how to fetch the above record.

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possible duplicate of how to escape special character in mysql –  ajreal Sep 8 '11 at 5:58
    
my query is not gives any error it's unable to fetch record and suppose i change the above is like %A3/7/2011%' and if record is present inside my db then it will fetch the record –  subodh Sep 8 '11 at 6:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Backslashes are difficult in mysql. I just ran a test directly from the mysql client, and found that to add the field, you do a single escape (two backslashes):

INSERT INTO mytable (field1) VALUES ('ASDFA3\\7\\2011QWER');

But with the LIKE command, escapes are needed to be represented literally, so you need to double-escape the statement (four backslashes):

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE field1 LIKE '%A3\\\\7\\\\2011%';

Add to that the escapes necessary for you application layer, and it could get quite confusing. An alternative is to use a single character wildcard:

SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE field1 LIKE '%A3_7_2011%';

Another alternative is to use the 'NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES' mode:

SET SESSION sql_mode='NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES';
SELECT * FROM mytable WHERE field1 LIKE '%A3\7\2011%';

EDIT (thanks, lucek):

Or, to preserve the current sql_mode:

SET @temp_sql_mode = @@SESSION.sql_mode;
SET SESSION sql_mode = CONCAT_WS(',', @@SESSION.sql_mode, 'NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES');
-- YOUR_SELECT_GOES_HERE;
SET SESSION sql_mode = @temp_sql_mode;
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Thanks a lot it helped me thanks.... –  subodh Sep 8 '11 at 6:19
    
after executing this SET SESSION sql_mode='NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES'; how to set SET SESSION sql_mode default as it was. –  subodh Sep 8 '11 at 9:01
    
Just do a SET SESSION sql_mode=''; –  Doug Kress Sep 8 '11 at 21:42
    
@ Doug Kress : Thanks –  subodh Sep 9 '11 at 10:07
    
@DougKress actually it'll mess things up if more than one flag has been set in sql_mode. Proper way of doing this is: SET (at)temp_sql_mode = (at)(at)SESSION.sql_mode; SET SESSION sql_mode = CONCAT_WS(',', (at)(at)SESSION.sql_mode, 'NO_BACKSLASH_ESCAPES'); YOUR_SELECT_GOES_HERE; SET SESSION sql_mode = (at)temp_sql_mode; –  matt Jan 15 '13 at 9:24

The backslash is the standard escape character in MySQL. If you want to use the backslash character literally, you have to define another escape character for this query:

SELECT *
FROM PMT_PROJECT
WHERE PROJECT_CODE LIKE '%A3\7\2011%' ESCAPE '|' AND COMPANY_ID=14
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I tried to find documentation of "ESCAPE 'character'" but came up with nothing. Can You point me to MySQL documentation with ESCAPE described? –  matt Jan 15 '13 at 9:16
    

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