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I'm curious if any developers use string.IsNullOrEmpty() more often with a negative than with a positive

e.g.

if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty())

This is how I use the method 99% of the time. What was the design decision for this?

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10  
I think methods with boolean result should be "positive" in the sense that they should use "Is..." instead of "Not..." ... just an idea why it's that way. –  Joey Apr 9 '09 at 14:01
    
@Johannes yeah...definitely positive! –  afgallo Apr 9 '09 at 14:02
    
Why does MS find it necessary to add in extra bloat? Ugh.. –  Joe Philllips Apr 9 '09 at 14:45
7  
how is it bloat? if anything, your redundant use of "extra" for the word "bloat" sounds like bloat to me... –  Erich Mirabal Apr 9 '09 at 17:32
3  
Review 99% of IsNullOrEmpty() calls in your code and try to apply 'Replace Nested Conditional with Guard Clauses' refactoring. –  Dmitriy Matveev May 6 '10 at 9:29

13 Answers 13

up vote 45 down vote accepted

Because "IsNullOrEmpty" is easier to understand than "NotNullOrEmpty". The latter could be interpreted as:

  1. It's not null and it's not empty
  2. It's not null or it is empty
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Double negatives are usually discouraged in naming stuff. !string.NotNullOrEmpty(...) would make one.

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We actually had a guy name a variable "isNotGuam" in our code base. Its always real fun trying to decipher what is meant by (in Delphi) if not isNotGuam then –  John Kraft Apr 9 '09 at 14:06
1  
if (!string.NotNullOrEmpty(..)) { } else { //goooooo! } –  meandmycode Apr 9 '09 at 14:17
    
You don't have to make the verb negative though, that was a bad example –  Chris S Apr 9 '09 at 15:26

For those logicians out there, !string.IsNullOrEmpty is not equivalent to string.IsNotNullOrEmpty. @Guffa has it correct. Using DeMorgan's law, it would have to be string.IsNotNullAndNotEmpty to be equivalent.

¬(null ∨ empty) ⇔ ¬null ∧ ¬empty

¬(null ∨ empty) ≠ ¬null ∨ empty

The point here, I guess, is that the way it is currently is unambiguous, where as making the opposite unambiguous would be cumbersome.

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Just as a side note, I prefer the extension method:

public static class StringExtensions
{
    public static bool IsNullOrEmpty(this string value)
    {
        return string.IsNullOrEmpty(value);
    }
}

I find it reads better to say:

if(myValue.IsNullOrEmpty())

or

if(!myValue.IsNullOrEmpty())
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2  
Except that you shouldn't make extension methods work with null instances as you can't do that with normal methods. –  Dan Apr 9 '09 at 14:10
2  
@Dan: You can actually, stackoverflow.com/questions/647643/…. +1. –  sipwiz Apr 9 '09 at 14:13
3  
@Dan: I suppose that is just philosophy... I have no problem with extension methods that work on null as long as it is clear in the method name: value.IsNull(), value.ThrowIfNull() or value.IsNullOrEmpty(). –  Brian Genisio Apr 9 '09 at 14:43
1  
But what do you think about extension methods that are specifically named Null ? –  Brian Genisio Apr 9 '09 at 16:33
2  
I'm sure that Uncle Bob would probably disapprove but I don't think that the sky will fall on our heads if we do foo.IsNull() - I would say it is pretty obvious what you are trying to achieve –  Calanus Aug 19 '09 at 12:15

C# naming conventions dictate that your expressions should be in the positive such as "Is..." and not "IsNot..."

EDIT: Typically, I use it when doing error checking and input validation at the beginning of a method and raise an exception if the parameter is null or empty.

if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(myParameter))
{
throw new ....
}

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Perhaps because then the name would have to be the lengthy IsNotNullAndNotEmpty to be as specific.

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I always create an extension method for "HasContent()" which generally makes sense, follows the "positive" specifications, and saves on code bloat because I use it much more often than its counterpart:

public static bool HasContent(this string s) {
    return !string.IsNullOrEmpty(s);
}
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Thank you. I was just thinking about the best name for this. I came up with "HasValue" and "IsPopulated," but HasContent is probably better than both. –  Neil Whitaker Oct 24 '11 at 19:57

Of course you could always use string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(string) now instead of string .IsNullOrEmpty(string) from .NET 4.0

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That is the most common usage I have seen.

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"NotNullOrEmpty" is ambiguous, it could mean "(not null) or empty" or it could mean "not (null or empty)". To make it unambiguous you'd have to use "NotNullAndNotEmpty", which is a mouthfull.

Also, the "IsNullOrEmpty" naming encourages use as a guard clause, which I think is useful. E.g.:

if (String.IsNullOrEmpty(someString))
{
   // error handling
   return;
}
// do stuff

which I think is generally cleaner than:

if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someString))
{
   // do stuff
}
else
{
   // error handling
   return;
}
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I would actually be inclined to offer a different answer from the "it's ambiguous" explanation provided by several others (though I agree with that answer as well):

Personally, I like to minimize nesting in my code, as (to me) the more curly braces code has, the harder it becomes to follow.

Therefore I'd much prefer this (for example):

public bool DoSomethingWithString(string s) {
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(s))
        return false;

    // here's the important code, not nested
}

to this:

public bool DoSomethingWithString(string s) {
    if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(s)) {
        // here's the important code, nested
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

This is a pretty specific scenario (where a null/empty string prompts an immediate exit) and clearly isn't the way a method using IsNullOrEmpty would always be structured; but I think it's actually pretty common.

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Personally I prefer to cater for the non negated scenario first. It just makes sense to me to do the true part first and then the false. Comes down to personal style.

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I've always thought it seemed the wrong way round as I use the negative much more often than the positive.

I would also like there to be an instance IsEmpty() or IsNotEmpty() for use when the variable is declared within the function. This could not be IsNullOrEmpty() or IsNotNullOrEmpty() as if the instance was null then you would get a null reference exception.

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