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I am reading the source code for glibc2.9. Reading the source code for the strcpy function, the performance is not as good as I expect.

The following is the source code of strcpy in glibc2.9:

   char * strcpy (char *dest, const char* src)
    {
        reg_char c;
        char *__unbounded s = (char *__unbounded) CHECK_BOUNDS_LOW (src);
        const ptrdiff_t off = CHECK_BOUNDS_LOW (dest) - s - 1;
        size_t n;

        do {
            c = *s++;
            s[off] = c;
        }
        while (c != '\0');

        n = s - src;
        (void) CHECK_BOUNDS_HIGH (src + n);
        (void) CHECK_BOUNDS_HIGH (dest + n);

        return dest;
    }

Because I don't know the reason for using the offset, I did some performance tests by comparing the above code with the following code:

char* my_strcpy(char *dest, const char *src)
{
    char *d = dest;
    register char c;

    do {
        c = *src++;
        *d++ = c;
    } while ('\0' != c);

    return dest;
}

As a result, the performance of strcpy is worse during my tests. I have removed the codes about bound pointer.

Why does the glibc version use the offsets??

The following is the introduction about the tests.

  1. platform: x86(Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4), gcc version 4.4.2
  2. compile flag: No flags, because I don't want any optimisation; The command is gcc test.c.

The test code I used is the following:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* my_strcpy1(char *dest, const char *src)
{
    char *d = dest;
    register char c;

    do {
        c = *src++;
        *d++ = c;
    } while ('\0' != c);

    return dest;
}

/* Copy SRC to DEST. */
char *
my_strcpy2 (dest, src)
     char *dest;
     const char *src;
{
  register char c;
  char * s = (char *)src;
  const int off = dest - s - 1;

  do
    {
      c = *s++;
      s[off] = c;
    }
  while (c != '\0');

  return dest;
}

int main()
{
    const char str1[] = "test1";
    const char str2[] = "test2";
    char buf[100];

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10000000; ++i) {
        my_strcpy1(buf, str1);
        my_strcpy1(buf, str2);
    }

    return 0;
}

When using the my_strcpy1 function, the outputs are:

[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.519s
user    0m0.517s
sys     0m0.001s
[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.520s
user    0m0.520s
sys     0m0.001s
[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.519s
user    0m0.516s
sys     0m0.002s

When useing my_strcpy2, the output is:

[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.647s
user    0m0.647s
sys     0m0.000s
[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.642s
user    0m0.638s
sys     0m0.001s
[root@Lnx99 test]#time ./a.out

real    0m0.639s
user    0m0.638s
sys     0m0.002s

I know it is not very accurate with the command time. But I could get the answer from the user time.

Update:

To remove the cost used to calculate the offset, I removed some code and added a global variable.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

char* my_strcpy1(char *dest, const char *src)
{
    char *d = dest;
    register char c;

    do {
        c = *src++;
        *d++ = c;
    } while ('\0' != c);

    return dest;
}


int off;

/* Copy SRC to DEST. */
char *
my_strcpy2 (dest, src)
     char *dest;
     const char *src;
{
  register char c;
  char * s = (char *)src;

  do
    {
      c = *s++;
      s[off] = c;
    }
  while (c != '\0');

  return dest;
}

int main()
{
    const char str1[] = "test1test1test1test1test1test1test1test1";
    char buf[100];

    off = buf-str1-1;

    int i;
    for (i = 0; i < 10000000; ++i) {
        my_strcpy2(buf, str1);
    }

    return 0;
}

But the performance of my_strcpy2 is still worse than my_strcpy1. Then I checked the assembled code but failed to get the answer too.

I also enlarged the size of string and the performance of my_strcpy1 is still better than my_strcpy2

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1  
Care to post the details of your platform, compiler version, optimization flags and the actual timings you got with both functions? –  NPE Sep 8 '11 at 7:07
2  
That is the C version of strcpy, your platform almost certainly has an assembly version which glibc uses instead. –  Dietrich Epp Sep 8 '11 at 7:25
    
"... I did some performance tests ...". What tests did you do? Are you sure you tested the optimized release version of the code? All these CHECK_BOUNDS_HIGH macros look like extra safety checks for debugging version of the code (when "bounded pointer" support is enabled). Testing the performance with these debug macros enabled makes no sense. –  AndreyT Sep 8 '11 at 7:34
    
How large are your strings? If they are small enough, the overhead of the function call to the assembly version could make the difference. (The assembly version can't be inlined, but your simple loop can.) –  Mysticial Sep 8 '11 at 7:47
3  
It really doesn't matter which unoptimized version is faster. If you want fast code, you would enable compiler optimizations. So for real use it only matters which version is faster when you enable compiler optimizations. –  sth Sep 16 '12 at 22:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Based on what I'm seeing, I'm not at all surprised that your code is faster.

Look at the loop, both your loop and glibc's loop are virtually identical. But glibc's has a extra code before and after...

In general, simple offsets do not slow down performance because x86 allows a fairly complicated indirect-addressing scheme. So both loops here will probably run at identical speeds.

EDIT: Here's my update with the added info you gave.

Your string size is only 5 characters. Even though the offset method "may" be slightly faster in the long run, the fact that it needs several operations to compute the offset before starting the loop is slowing it down for short strings. Perhaps if you tried larger strings the gap will narrow and possibly vanish altogether.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks your update. I also thought about the cost used to calculate the offset yesterday. Then I removed the calculation of offset. Add a global variable offset, which is calculated outside the loop in main. But the performance of my_strcpy2 still is worse than my_strcpy1. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 5:39
    
Then at this point, it's most likely due to the CPU pipeline. Perhaps the your old Pentium 4 can't process indirect addressing efficiently. I didn't get into HPC until the late-core 2 era, so I don't know anything about the Pentiums. (I was still in high school during the Pentium era...) –  Mysticial Sep 9 '11 at 5:42
    
I disassemble the my_strcpy1 and my_strcpy2, the assemble codes of loop of both of them are very similar. I didn't find any valuable information. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 6:03
    
You've taken it probably as far as you can go. The only thing left is to get a cycle-accurate Pentium 4 emulator and watch the pipeline. Though I bet they don't exist outside of Intel's internals. You're better off running this code on some other machines to see how they behave. –  Mysticial Sep 9 '11 at 6:06
    
I tested the codes on the another machine whose CPU is "Pentium(R) Dual-Core CPU E5300". The performance of my_strcpy2 still is worse. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 6:25

It uses the offset method because this eliminates one increment from the loop - the glibc code only has to increment s, whereas your code has to increment both s and d.

Note that the code you're looking at is the architecture-independent fallback implementation - glibc has overriding assembly implementations for many architectures (eg. the x86-64 strcpy()).

share|improve this answer
2  
Even better, modern compilers treat this sort of functions as builtins, so probable the fallback code is almost never used. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 8 '11 at 7:57
1  
I get you, but I want to study the codes which is architecture-independent. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 5:36
    
I thought about the cost used to calculate offset yesterday. I moved the codes used to calculate offset, and added one new global variable. But the result is not changed. I have added the latest test codes on the post. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 5:57
1  
@user411318: The architecture-independent code is not necessarily going to be the fastest on any particular architecture - especially on an architecturally odd design like the Pentium 4. That, after all, is why there are architecture-specific overrides! The tradeoff here - one less increment in the loop for a variable pointer offset - will work out differently on different CPUs. You need to do much wider testing (including much longer strings) to fully evaluate the design. –  caf Sep 9 '11 at 6:07
    
I get your meaning. Maybe this is the reason. The generic codes of strcpy in glibc are not good for x86. –  linuxer Sep 9 '11 at 6:28

Here is my own optimization of strcpy. I think it had 2x-3x speedup vs naive implementation, but it need to be benchmarked.

http://codereview.stackexchange.com/questions/30337/x86-strcpy-can-this-be-shortened/30348#30348

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