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If I use something like double to hold file sizes in bytes, this will naturally fail very soon, so which data type would I use? Nowadays a couple of TB are common, so I'd like the data type to be able to hold a number that big.

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+1 for bothering to ask rather than just using something bogus. :-) And welcome to SO! –  R.. Sep 8 '11 at 12:47
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6 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It will depends on you platform. On Unix System, you can probably use the off_t type. On Windows, you'll probably want to use LARGE_INTEGER. Those are the types used on those system by the function returning the file size (stat on Unix, GetFileSize on Windows).

If you want a portable type, uint64_t should be large enough.

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After a quick Google session it looks like uint64_t is what I want. Thanks! I'm overwhelmed by the number of responses and the response time. SO is marvelous! –  EnibMoc1994 Sep 8 '11 at 8:37
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@EnibMoc1994: You could also use long long or its unsigned partner, which are guaranteed to be at least 64 bits. –  caf Sep 8 '11 at 13:42
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There is a function called ftello() which returns a off_t.

With fgetpos(), you need a fpos_t variable - EDIT: which is not necessarily an arithmetic type.

So off_t could/should be appropriate to fit your needs, and keeps you independent of the actual data type sizes.

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Just beware that ftello and off_t are Posix, not standard C. –  Steve Jessop Sep 8 '11 at 9:35
    
If you don't have off_t you don't have ftello either and there's no (portable) way to get a file offset larger than long... –  R.. Sep 8 '11 at 12:47
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You might want to look at using off_t, since this is what standard functions such as fseeko and ftello use.

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size_t is the usual for filesizes in C, but the type of it is platform dependent (32-bit or 64-bit unsigned int on Windows). I'd suggest __int64 (a 64-bit int) - should cope with up to 138,547,332 terrabytes.

EDIT: Just checking, the Windows API call GetFileSizeEx gets you a LARGE_INTEGER, which is a 64-bit signed integer. So LARGE_INTEGER would be a good one too.

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For the record, size_t is 64bit in size in 64bit builds. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 8 '11 at 8:21
    
It is not an unsigned int, it is an unsigned integral type. –  paxdiablo Sep 8 '11 at 8:21
    
Apologies, @paxdiablo, it's actually platform dependent as you imply. On Windows using 32-bit it's equivalent to an unsigned int. Last time I trust what Visual Studio tells me. :) Have edited my answer to be more precise. More info here: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Size_t –  Nick Shaw Sep 8 '11 at 8:28
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size_t is not the right abstraction on many systems, it is meant to handle the size of objects. On a typical 32 bit system this would be a 32 bit value, whereas your files could be much larger than 4GiB. –  Jens Gustedt Sep 8 '11 at 8:49
    
Correct - "size_t" is meant to handle the size of objects, "off_t" the offset of files. "off_t" translates to "long long" (64-bit unsigned integer) in most modern I/O libraries. –  paulsm4 Sep 8 '11 at 19:09
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The libc stat uses off_t, which is a typedef for an unsigned, 64-bit wide type. That would be suitable for a little while.

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long long is a Pop Favorite :)

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