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I have tests for my project broken up into multiple files - test/test_1.rb and test/test_2.rb.

Running 'rake test' gives:

$ rake test
ruby -I"lib:test" -I"/foo/rake-0.9.2/lib" "/foo/rake_test_loader.rb" "test/test_general.rb test/test_cv.rb"
/home/rob/.rvm/gems/ruby-1.9.2-p290/gems/rake-0.9.2/lib/rake/rake_test_loader.rb:11:in `require': no such file to load -- /home/rob/src/robsyme/bioruby-chado/test/test_general.rb test/test_cv.rb (LoadError)
... #you can guess the rest

Note the last argument in the ruby command : "test/test_general.rb test/test_cv.rb"

If I remove the quotes (splitting the last argument into two arguments), the tests run perfectly.

  1. Why would rake's test runner be grouping the two files together into the one argument?
  2. Am I doing something wrong with the rake test setup?

Environment:

$ grep -A4 TestTask Rakefile 
Rake::TestTask.new(:test) do |test|
  test.libs << 'test'
  test.pattern = FileList['test/**/test_*.rb']
  test.verbose = true
end
$ ruby -v
ruby 1.9.2p290 (2011-07-09 revision 32553) [x86_64-linux]
$ gem --version
1.8.10
$ rake --version
rake, version 0.9.2
share|improve this question
    
Do you have an unusual shell? Or non standard $IFS variable? –  Bruno Rohée Sep 8 '11 at 9:56
    
Also the value of test.pattern.inspect could possibly help –  Bruno Rohée Sep 8 '11 at 9:59
1  
@sunkencity got it. I was using test.pattern = FileList... when I should have been using test.test_files = FileList... –  Rob Syme Sep 9 '11 at 2:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Added:

test.test_files = FileList['test/test*.rb']

File list should be given to test files not to pattern. To pattern I suppose you can give a pattern as a string.

Previous answer (misunderstood question)

That's just how the shell works. You can quote a filename if you want to target a filename that has space in it. It then get's passed as one argument and not two.

$ cat > "foo bar"
foobar
^D
$ cat foo\ bar 
foobar
$ cat "foo bar" 
foobar

or

$ ls "Rakefile Gemfile"
ls: Rakefile Gemfile: No such file or directory

$ ls Rakefile Gemfile
Gemfile  Rakefile
share|improve this answer
1  
You're off the mark, he seems to be aware of how the shell works. He wants to know why rake test groups filenames. –  Benoit Garret Sep 8 '11 at 13:17
1  
The deep issue is why rake generates "test/test_general.rb test/test_cv.rb". The explanation is good tho. –  Bruno Rohée Sep 8 '11 at 13:25
    
Yep missed what the question was. Updated with the correct answer. If he wants to use pattern it should be a pattern and not a filelist. –  sunkencity Sep 8 '11 at 19:30
1  
Spot on, sunkencity. Thanks! –  Rob Syme Sep 9 '11 at 1:46

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