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What is the difference between + and & for joining strings in VB.NET?

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That is the weirdest looking ampersand (&) I have ever seen... –  TheTXI Apr 9 '09 at 14:58
    
lol, it's a "Trebuchet MS" ampersand –  dr. evil Apr 9 '09 at 15:03
    
better than the zaph dingbats version! –  gonzobrains Mar 6 '13 at 9:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

There's no difference if both operands are strings. However, if one operand is a string, and one is a number, then you run into problems, see the code below.

"abc" + "def" = "abcdef"
"abc" & "def" = "abcdef"
"111" + "222" = "111222"
"111" & "222" = "111222"
"111" & 222 = "111222"
"111" + 222 = 333
"abc" + 222 = conversion error

Therefore I recommend to always use & when you mean to concatenate, because you might be trying to concatenate an integer, float, decimal to a string, which will cause an exception, or at best, not do what you probably want it to do.

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6  
Or always enforce Option Strict On, in which case you never need to worry about it. Option Strict On has numerous other advantages as well: stackoverflow.com/questions/222370/… –  mattmc3 Jul 19 '10 at 3:55
2  
There is a problem with & for string concatenation. From the documentation "The & operator always widens its operands to String, regardless of the setting of Option Strict". So for example "Hello " & 2.5 will silently convert the 2.5 to a string using the regional settings (you might get "2.5" or "2,5"). Fine if that was what you wanted. I would much, much rather be forced to specify explicitly. –  MarkJ Sep 19 '11 at 10:24
    
@MarkJ Oh yeah, that regional stuff can really get you if you don't watch it. Especially on web servers. If you have a bunch of web servers, you should make sure they are all configured to the same regional settings, lets you get wierd formatting problems with numbers and dates. –  Kibbee Sep 19 '11 at 12:33
    
For completeness, it should also be worth noting what is returned when you perform "abc" & 222 ("abc222"). –  Dan Atkinson Jan 9 at 11:29

The & operator always makes sure that both operands are strings, while the + operator finds the overload that matches the operands.

The expression 1 & 2 gives the value "12", while the expression 1 + 2 gives the value 3.

If both operands are strings, there is no difference in the result.

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+ operator only carries out implicit conversion if Option Strict is Off. But & operator will carry out implicit conversion to string regardless of the Option Strict setting. Documentation "The & operator always widens its operands to String, regardless of the setting of Option Strict". So for example "Hello " & 2.5 will silently convert the 2.5 to a string using the regional settings (you might get "2.5" or "2,5"). Fine if that was what you wanted. –  MarkJ Sep 19 '11 at 10:26

The + operator can be either addition or concatenation. The & is only concatenation. If the expressions are both strings the results would be the same.

I use & when working with strings, and + when working with numbers, so there is never confusion about my intent. If you mistakenly use + and one expression is a string and one is a number, you run the risk of un-desired results.

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There is no difference in most of the cases. However, the best practice is:

"+" should be reserved for integer additions, because if you don't use Option Strict On then you might have really messed up situations such as:

Input + 12 might give you 20 instead of 812. This can be especially bad in an ASP.NET application where the input comes from POST/GET.

Simply put: For joining strings, always use "&" instead of "+".

Obviously, use StringBuilder where it's suitable :)

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If both of the types are statically typed to System.String, there is zero difference between the code. Both will resolve down to the String.Concat member (this is what + does for strings).

However, if the objects are not strongly typed to string, Visual Basic late binding will kick in and go two very different routes. The + version will attempt to do an add operation which literally tries to add the objects. This will do all manner of attempts to convert both values to a number and then add them.

The & operator will attempt to concatenate. The Visual Basic runtime will go through all manner of conversions to convert both values to strings. It will then String.Concat the results.

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Also worth mentioning that the & operator disregards Option Strict. From the documentation "The & operator always widens its operands to String, regardless of the setting of Option Strict". So for example "Hello " & 2.5 will silently convert the 2.5 to a string using the regional settings (you might get "2.5" or "2,5"). Fine if that was what you wanted. Contrast with + which is strict when Option Strict On –  MarkJ Sep 19 '11 at 10:27

None when joining strings:

    Dim string1 As String = "A" + "B"
    Dim string2 As String = "A" & "B"

    If string1.Equals(string2) And string2.Equals(string1) Then
        Debugger.Break()
    End If
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