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I've drawn a linechart with g.raphael. I've made a custom x-axis with my own values. And now I want these values to be rotated 90 degrees, so they're vertical instead of horizontal.

To do that, I'm using raphaels rotate() function. And this works perfectly in both IE (8) and Opera. But in Firefox nothing happens, and Firebug prints this error

Unexpected value rotate(90 NaN Infinity) parsing transform attribute.

I can't find anything about this error elsewhere, and I can't see how it isn't correct. And even more so, I find it extremely weird that it works in the other browsers.

Anybody have a clue about this?

My code - where xcoor is a simple int list of values 0-30:

for (var i in xcoor) {
     var dato = new Date();
     dato.setDate(new Date().getDate() - i);

     var xTxt = r.text(30 + (i * (725 / 30)), 315, dato.getDate() + '/' + (dato.getMonth() + 1)).rotate(90);
}
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Found an answer, but I'm not able to answer my own question for 8 hours after asking.Posting it tomorrow, in case anybody else comes across the issue! –  DummeDitte Sep 8 '11 at 13:42

1 Answer 1

Well, after hours of googling, reading and more googling, I finally found a solution.

I still don't get why the first one doesn't work. But none the less I figured out a way that works in all the browsers:

for (var i in xcoor) {
     var dato = new Date();
     dato.setDate(new Date().getDate() - i);
     var xTxt = blokCanvas.text(40 + (i * (725 / 30)), 315, dato.getDate() + '/' + (dato.getMonth() + 1))
     xTxt.rotate(90, (40 + (i * (725 / 30))), 315);
}

The rotate-function comes in more different version. One of them is this

rotate(degrees, x, y)

Where degrees represents the number of degrees the item should rotate and x, y represents the coordinates of the point around which the item should be rotated.

Setting the x,y values to the same as the ones placing the item in the first place gives me the wanted result.

Yay!

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Don't you just hate it when you can't figure out why something doesn't work like it ought to? –  graham.reeds Sep 9 '11 at 8:23
    
I would also assign (40 + (i * (725 / 30))) to a variable to avoid calculating it twice (though the cost is probably inconsequential to the cost of drawing it. –  graham.reeds Sep 9 '11 at 8:34

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