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I have just got weird error which involves protected modifier.

I have following code:

package p1;

public class C1 {
    protected void doIt() {}
}


package p2;

public class C2 extends p1.C1 {
    private C1 c1_instance;
    public void doItAgain() {
        c1_instance.doIt(); // wtf!!!!
    }
}

I get error, stating that doIt has protected access and can't be accessed! But I am in the sub class and do have and access to doIt method.

Is not it a bug?

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4  
Why are you creating an instance of a class you're extending? –  Bobby Sep 8 '11 at 10:25
    
Why not? That is normal I think. But if opposite thing (parent class creates it's descendant instance) is happening then there is something broken in class design. –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 10:30
1  
No, I don't think that's normal. If you extend a class, then you extend the base class, means that C2 can now do everything that C1 can (you can directly call doIt() from within C2, I mean, if it wouldn't be protected)...no need for an instance of C1. –  Bobby Sep 8 '11 at 10:33
    
I wouldn't worry too much about package level access stuff, it doesn't come into play most of the time. However, Bobby is correct; creating an instance of the base class in a subclass is unusual and normally unnecessary. –  Adrian Mouat Sep 8 '11 at 11:24
    
I am not creating it, it comes from base class. –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 14:53
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6 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I also had the impression what protected meant "accessible from the same package or from a subclass" but the Java Language Specification is of course more precise, and explains that in a subclass S of C, "If the access is by a qualified name Q.Id, where Q is an ExpressionName, then the access is permitted if and only if the type of the expression Q is S or a subclass of S."

So you can only access a protected method of the superclass via a reference to the subclass you are calling from, like this:

public class C2 extends C1 {
    private C2 c2_other_instance;
    public void doItAgain() {
        c2_other_instance.doIt();
    }
}

If you explain why you want to access one instance of the superclass from a different instance of the subclass then someone might be able to suggest a better design. Otherwise you will have to make the method public or put the classes in the same package.

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Good clarification. Subtle though - I had to read it a couple of times to fully understand! –  Adrian Mouat Sep 9 '11 at 11:04
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In Java, you can't call protected methods on a different instance of the base class, even from within a subclass:

public class C2 extends p1.C1 {
    private C1 c1_instance;
    public void doItAgain() {
        doIt();             // fine
        c1_instance.doIt(); // disallowed
    }
}

The only exception is when both the base class and the subclass are in the same package.

To quote the Java OO tutorial:

The protected modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed within its own package (as with package-private) and, in addition, by a subclass of its class in another package.

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The only exception is when both the base class and the subclass are in the same package. Why? –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 10:39
    
@misha nesterenko: Simply because this is how the language works. See the tutorial I've linked to in my answer. –  NPE Sep 8 '11 at 10:49
    
by a subclass of its class in another package I don't see any violation of this rule, I am in a subclass of its class in another package. –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 10:54
    
That seems to be just obscure documentation, but I would like to know why that restriction is applied? –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 10:56
    
@misha nesterenko The statement "by a subclass of its class in another package" means it can be called directly by the subclass, not an instance in the subclass. –  Adrian Mouat Sep 8 '11 at 11:21
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Protected is equivalent to package level access; you can't access the method if you are in a different package.

You should be able to call doIt() directly without going through the c1_instance object however, as C2 is a subclass.

From http://download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/accesscontrol.html

"The protected modifier specifies that the member can only be accessed within its own package (as with package-private) and, in addition, by a subclass of its class in another package."

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C2 may be a sub class of C1, but this does not mean it can access those methods on a different instance, i.e. c1_instance may not be an instance of C2. You could access it if it was in the same package.

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That's really strange and bad :(. I don't understand why this restriction is applied. If I call from the same package c1_instance may not be an instance of C2 also. –  michael nesterenko Sep 8 '11 at 10:38
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No, protected assures access in the same package and in the descendant classes. You are neither in the same package nor you are accessing it directly from a descendant class. C2 is a descendant but c1_instance isn't.

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If your method is declared as protected then you can access this within this class , withing the package and within the subclass.

now here is the question , why is there an error inspite of accessing this protected member from its subclass. the answer is to access the protected method from a subclass your subclass should use the method directly from the direct subclass. here the direct subclass is C2 but the instance c1_instance is not. you can use this method directly (doIt() in place of c1_instance.doIt())

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