Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the best hash function to use on a file-hosting website? I'd like to store hashes for every file, so that I won't have to waste HD space for duplicate files.

The problem is, sha1/md5 are slow for big files and the expected traffic is high. What's the best solution? Hashing in memory, while receiving the file from user over network?

My main concern is site's performance. Expected traffic is high, so hashing can be a bottleneck.

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

For large files, all hashes will run at around the same speed, as they're limited by how fast you can read the file from disk. In general, a site like the one you're describing will be bottlenecked by how fast your disks and network are, not by anything running on the CPU.

share|improve this answer
add comment

What's the best hash function to use on a file-hosting website?

SHA is better hash than MD5.

The problem is, sha1/md5 are slow for big files and the expected traffic is high. What's the best solution? Hashing in memory, while receiving the file from user over network?

Is this internal or external hosting? For internal I would hash on client side. Have you tried to estimate how many files would be duplicates? Maybe there is no benefit with hashing - would save you little space in comparison to waste CPU cycles.

share|improve this answer
    
Read the problem statement carefully, SHA is not better than MD5 for this application, it is worse. This is not for security, it is to detect duplicates. –  GregS Sep 9 '11 at 1:21
add comment

There are many different hash formulations, and the best solution is a function of different parameters including how many files you expect to have in the lifetime of the site, how bad would it be to have a few duplicates, how much CPU horsepower you can devote to the hash function, etc.

Here is one interesting 64-bit hash function I found in wikipedia that should be very fast to compute and should provide reasonable collision properties. Also examine the other hash functions linked to on that page, one of them is bound to be just what you need.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.