Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have code that's very messy with the if - else if checks it is doing. The amount of branching and nested branching is quite big (over 20 if - else if and nested too). It's making my code harder to read and will probably be a performance hog. My application checks for a lot of conditions it gets from the user and so the application must check all the time for different situations, for example:

If the textbox text is not 0, continue with the next...

if ((StartInt != 0) && (EndInt != 0))   
{

And then here it checks to see whether the user have choosen dates:

if ((datePickerStart.SelectedDate == null) || (datePickerEnd.SelectedDate == null)) 
{
    MessageBox.Show("Please Choose Dates");
}

Here, if the datepickers aren't null it continues with code...

else if ((datePickerStart.SelectedDate != null) && (datePickerEnd.SelectedDate != null))
{
    // CONDITIONS FOR SAME STARTING DAY AND ENDING DAY.
    if (datePickerStart.SelectedDate == datePickerEnd.SelectedDate)
    {
        if (index1 == index2)
        {
            if (StartInt == EndInt)
            {
                if (radioButton1.IsChecked == true)
                {
                    printTime3();
                }
                else
                {
                    printTime();
                }
            }

This is just a small part of the checks being made. Some of them are functionals and some are for input validation stuff.

Is there any way to make it more readable and less of a performance hog?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe you should do Validation's in front of the Method or Event if you're doing it within ,like if(dtp.SelectedDate == null) return; than proceed with Information handling. –  Burimi Sep 8 '11 at 13:07
1  
I have a strong feeling SelectedDate is from a calender control, those can never be null, you need to check datePickerStart.SelectedDate == DateTime.MinValue instead. –  Scott Chamberlain Sep 8 '11 at 13:16
    
The code is working well thats not my problem. the problem i'm reffering to is the readability and performance of such complex if else branching –  Yosi199 Sep 8 '11 at 13:24

7 Answers 7

up vote 11 down vote accepted

It's not that of a performance hog. A great blog post on how to fix those common problems is Flattening Arrow Code.

share|improve this answer
    
That looks like what I need I will soon check it out and post back –  Yosi199 Sep 8 '11 at 13:29

I see here some mix in validation. Try to move one fields from others, and validate them separately, something like this:

if (StartInt == 0 || EndInt == 0)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Please Choose Ints");
    return;
}
if (datePickerStart.SelectedDate == null || datePickerEnd.SelectedDate == null)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Please Choose Dates");
    return;
}

In this approach you'll always say to the user what he did wrong, and your code is much simpler.

More information from Jeff's blog

share|improve this answer
    
the if ((StartInt != 0) && (EndInt != 0)) { is not for checking if the user inserted ints. its for checking if the input on 2 textboxs is 0 or not. if it is, then do something, else do something else. like I said some of the if else statements are for input validations but most of them are for condition checks. –  Yosi199 Sep 8 '11 at 13:25

One way is to refactor by encapsulating complex conditions in the following way:

public bool DateRangeSpecified
{
  get 
  {
    return (datePickerStart.SelectedDate != null) 
           && 
           (datePickerEnd.SelectedDate != null)
           && StartInt != 0 && EndInt != 0; 
  }
}

and then using these "condition facade" properties

share|improve this answer

Some slight refactoring makes it easier to read to my eyes. I removed extraneous brackets and consolidated multiple IF statements that are really just AND logic.

if (StartInt == 0 || EndInt == 0)    
    return;
if (datePickerStart.SelectedDate == null || datePickerEnd.SelectedDate == null)
{
    MessageBox.Show("Please Choose Dates");  
    return;           
}
if (datePickerStart.SelectedDate != null 
    && datePickerEnd.SelectedDate != null
    && datePickerStart.SelectedDate == datePickerEnd.SelectedDate
    && index1 == index2
    && StartInt == EndInt)
{
    if (radioButton1.IsChecked == true)
        printTime3();
    else
        printTime();
}
share|improve this answer

You can define your own predicates or generic functions with meaningful names and encapsulate you logic into those.

Here is a code example for some predicates:

public Predicate<DateTime> CheckIfThisYear = a => a.Year == DateTime.Now.Year;
public Func<DateTime, int, bool> CheckIfWithinLastNDays = (a, b) => (DateTime.Now - a).Days < b;

Now you can easily write in your code

if (CheckIfThisYear(offer) && CheckIfWithinLastNDays(paymentdate,30)) ProcessOrder();

Consider using generic delegates, like Func<> and Delegate<> for writing small blocks of your conditions using lambda-expressions -- it will both save the space and makes your code much more human-readable.

share|improve this answer

The readability issue is the biggest problem there rather than a performance hog...

If you use the same condition, check again and again. Write small methods/properties for those condition blocks that returns a bool:

 if (index1 == index2)
 {
     if (StartInt == EndInt)
     {
         if (radioButton1.IsChecked == true)
         {

And if there are no else clauses, the above code can be refactored as below...

if ((index1 == index2) &&
   (StartInt == EndInt) &&
   (radioButton1.IsChecked == true))
{

}
share|improve this answer

Use the return statement to stop the execution of a block.

For instance,

void Test()
{
    if (StartInt==0 || EndInt==0)
    {
        return;
    }

    if (datePickerStart.SelectedDate == null || datePickerEnd.SelectedDate == null)
    {
        MessageBox.Show("Please Choose Dates");
        return;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.