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Is there a better way of getting a raw list of SHA1s for ALL objects in a repository than doing ls .git/objects/??/\* and cat .git/objects/pack/*.idx | git show-index?

I know about git rev-list --all but that only lists commit objects that are referenced by .git/refs, and I'm looking for everything including unreferenced objects that are created by git-hash-object, git-mktree etc.

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I was just doing this yesterday on a test repo - used ls -alR .git/objects, but I agree that's not ideal... +1 –  johnny Sep 8 '11 at 14:25
2  
On the other hand, if you're looking for unreferenced objects in particular, git-fsck [--unreachable] may be of interest... –  johnny Sep 8 '11 at 14:28
1  
...and ls will only give you the loose objects, not the packed ones, which could also be unreferenced -- hence the git show-index in my question –  kbro Sep 8 '11 at 18:37
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4 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Mark's answer worked for me, after a few modifications:

  • Used --git-dir instead of --show-cdup to support bare repos
  • Avoided error when there are no packs
  • Used perl because OS X Mountain Lion's BSD-style sed doesn't support -r

#!/bin/sh

set -e

cd "$(git rev-parse --git-dir)"

# Find all the objects that are in packs:

find objects/pack -name 'pack-*.idx' | while read p ; do
    git show-index < $p | cut -f 2 -d ' '
done

# And now find all loose objects:

find objects/ \
    | egrep '[0-9a-f]{38}' \
    | perl -pe 's:^.*([0-9a-f][0-9a-f])/([0-9a-f]{38}):\1\2:' \
;
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Try

 git rev-list --objects --all

Edit Josh made a good point:

 git rev-list --objects -g --no-walk --all

list objects reachable from the ref-logs.

To see all objects in unreachable commits as well:

 git rev-list --objects --no-walk \
      $(git fsck --unreachable |
        grep '^unreachable commit' |
        cut -d' ' -f3)

Putting it all together, to really get all objects in the output format of rev-list --objects, you need something like

{
    git rev-list --objects --all
    git rev-list --objects -g --no-walk --all
    git rev-list --objects --no-walk \
        $(git fsck --unreachable |
          grep '^unreachable commit' |
          cut -d' ' -f3)
} | sort | uniq

To sort the output in slightly more useful way (by path for tree/blobs, commits first) use an additional | sort -k2 which will group all different blobs (revisions) for identical paths.

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That only lists the objects which are reachable from the refs/. The reflogs and the unreachable objects are not included. –  Josh Lee Sep 8 '11 at 16:08
    
@Josh, others: extended the answer to be somehwat less shallow. I hope it didn't just get too intimidating. I'm pretty sure the APIs contain superior methods to 'get' at the object database more succinctly –  sehe Sep 8 '11 at 22:11
    
@sehe: I have included a (somewhat modified) version of your script in my git scripts at github.com/johnbartholomew/gitvoodoo. I would like to release these scripts under GPLv3 -- could you tell me if this is acceptable to you? (the origin of the code is noted in the README and in a comment near the top of the script). Thanks for the useful extension! –  John Bartholomew Nov 13 '11 at 18:45
    
@JohnBartholomew: that's ok (the SO license is CC-wiki+SA). I'd seriously look at Marks answer too if you are going to distribute general purpose git scripts :) –  sehe Nov 13 '11 at 19:07
    
@sehe: Thanks. I originally used Mark's answer, but yours has the advantage that walking with rev-list allows extraction of things like a tree path for each blob (there isn't a unique one of course, but just having a valid one is informative). –  John Bartholomew Nov 13 '11 at 19:24
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I don't know of an obviously better way than just looking at all the loose object files and the indices of all pack files. The format of the git repository is very stable, and with this method you don't have to rely on having exactly the right options to git fsck, which is classed as porcelain. I think this method is faster, as well. The following script shows all the objects in a repository:

#!/bin/sh

set -e

cd "$(git rev-parse --show-cdup)"

# Find all the objects that are in packs:

for p in .git/objects/pack/pack-*.idx
do
    git show-index < $p | cut -f 2 -d ' '
done

# And now find all loose objects:

find .git/objects/ | egrep '[0-9a-f]{38}' | \
  sed -r 's,^.*([0-9a-f][0-9a-f])/([0-9a-f]{38}),\1\2,'

(My original version of this script was based on this useful script to find the largest objects in your pack files, but I switched to using git show-index, as suggested in your question.)

I've made this script into a GitHub gist.

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Another useful option is to use git verify-pack -v <packfile>

verify-pack -v lists all objects in the database along with their object type.

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