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i am facing the dreaded:

Validation of viewstate MAC failed. If this application is hosted by a Web Farm or cluster, ensure that configuration specifies the same validationKey and validation algorithm. AutoGenerate cannot be used in a cluster.

Error.

Ok so i looking it up and found that it can be caused by two things, viewState which can not be verified by the page, and/or events that can not be validated.

I put

<pages enableEventValidation="false" enableViewStateMac="false" viewStateEncryptionMode="Never">

In my web.config to stop the problem, but that hardly seems like a fix to me.

The thing is, i never even used viewState in my application. I know that asp.net uses viewstate by default to store some things, but i doubt the default values stored here will cause any errors.

I noticed that the problem seems to happen when i postBack and the page has not finished loading yet.

Thanks

Edit: Please, can someone test my website www.vittoriosaStarsNursery.com and see if you get the error i got above? I dont get it locally but people keep telling me they are getting it.

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up vote 10 down vote accepted

Isnt this just a case of putting a one liner in your web.config

<machineKey decryptionKey="A4B12CCDD50E95F8GB9GFH6JKAT4Y0U0I2OF2DF2AAFE5AB46189C,IsolateApps" validation="AES" validationKey="480CDF2AS9S9AS5CFDGF0GHFH9JJH4KHKAKLJ2L9F3SAS82A6C16911A29EF48903783F94529C21570AACB72766FB38CD4CE7B85B0ACE3149DC5FC1CCF1AA1CECE3579659996593B06,IsolateApps"/>
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What is that? Does it have to do with IIS? I came across that in my research about this problem – TheGateKeeper Sep 8 '11 at 16:35
    
that is the encryption codes and methods IIS uses to encrypt and decrypt the viewstate. if you dont have them, then when a new session starts, it generates them and stores them in RAM which the other servers in the farm cant obviously read and therefore dont know the codes to decrypt the viewstate – Christian Sep 8 '11 at 16:41
2  
it should be noted that you should keep these codes private and confidential because with them a hacker could potentially edit your viewstate and mess up your backend... hence why just copying and pasting the line i pasted wont work :) You can generate them yourself by going in to IIS, click your website and click Generate Keys (IIS7) – Christian Sep 8 '11 at 16:48
    
But what if i didnt even use ViewState in my project? Let alone encrypted it! – TheGateKeeper Sep 8 '11 at 17:08
    
viewstate is part of any aspx page and is encrypted by default – Christian Sep 8 '11 at 17:10

You're not going to like my answer. This error is basically unavoidable in webforms. My solution was to leave webforms for MVC3 and razor.

I noticed that the problem seems to happen when i postBack and the page has not finished loading yet.

this is one of the easiest ways to cause this error. In ASP.NET 3.5 (or 4.0) there's a setting that you can make sure viewstate gets loaded very early in the page to try to help diminish it. It still doesn't solve it.

Chunking the viewstate doesn't solve it.

There is just something inherently wrong to the way webforms works that this error will plague your application at random times forever.

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So it wasent something wrong i did? Dang... and i liked asp.net too :( – TheGateKeeper Sep 8 '11 at 14:38
    
I always did too, however MVC3 + razor is atleast 4-5x better IMO. My MVC applications can go days without adding a message to the error logs. The longest my webforms apps have ever gone is like 12 hours. – Chris Marisic Sep 8 '11 at 14:39
1  
My company makes a SaaS asp.net web forms application, when we get errpos in our log they are nearly always caused by bugs in our code. We rarely see this error. – Ben Robinson Sep 8 '11 at 20:35
1  
@BenRobinson What kind of bug in any code, at any level, anywhere, could corrupt the encrypted signed viewstate data that the client posted back to the web-server? – Ian Boyd Feb 8 '14 at 12:35

One thing I have come across that causes this issue has to do with the recycling intervals of the app-pools on the webserver.

I found this by looking at the event information in Eventviewer/Application logs and the "Task Category" called "Web Event". Then for the time period that this event took place I looked to see if there were any recycled events that took place just before that (Eventviewer/System logs and the "Source" called "WAS".

By default an app-pool will recycle every 1740 minutes (29 hours). If this recycle happened while a user is busy on the site and send post back to the server, the server no longer recognizes the session/viewstate and rejects what is being posted back.

To overcome this from our perspective is to set the recycle event to happen at a specific time of the day when we don't expect activity on the site. In our case 3am in the morning.

Hope that helps someone out there.

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At my site, this meta tag were causing the error:

<base href="http://www.SITEURL.COM" />

I have a dropdown, I update on another dropdowns changed selection. So when the postback happened (dropdown #2 changed index), I got the exception.

I've tried everything else from applying machinekey to web.config and setting theese attributes at the page

EnableViewState="false" EnableViewStateMac="false"

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I am using VS 2010 against a Windows Web Server 2008 and what I eventually found was that I had two keys set for the same service in the appSettings section of webconfig. I went to IIS and checked the Application Settings on the virtual directory and got an error, fixed it in the WebConfig and the problem resolved. I did create a machine key but that did not fix the problem. Nor did the

pages (...) validateRequest="false" enableEventValidation="false" enableViewStateMac="false" viewStateEncryptionMode ="Never"/

Settings. FWIW ...

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I used this Microsoft article to create my own machineKey validationkey and decryptionKey. As others have stated, this can be placed within the system.web section of web.config, though there are security concerns if other people get hold of the key.

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Well, yes i suppose disabling encrypted viewstate solves the problem but i have never tested it nor do I advise it. Viewstate stores the state of controls and is also very convenient for storing persistent variables.

Take for example you work for a garage and have a list of jobs. You go to a page that lists the jobs. Now you click a job which goes to another page appending the jobid (eg. job.aspx?id=1). On that page, there is a checkbox which marks the job as complete. Once you tick that checkbox, it posts data back to same page and writes to the database that the job is complete. But how does the server know which job to mark as complete because you have only posted back true or false from the checkbox. However, if the first time you load the job details page you record the job id in Viewstate, then when you post pack the checkbox, you can read in the jobid from the viewstate.

Why is it not good to use unencrypted viewstate?

Imagine what the server has to do to mark the job as complete. It probably has to run an sql command to update the database. Something like UPDATE jobs SET completed=GETDATE() WHERE id=1.

If your viewstate wasnt encrypted and i could add my own job id, I would put something like '; DELETE FROM jobs;' which would then cancel out the initial UPDATE command and delete ALL your jobs... not very good for the garage :)

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Why are you using ASPX pages? It sounds like you might be better off with php or even shtml :) pages. – Christian Sep 8 '11 at 21:56
    
view state encryption doesnt work like that (and im quoting a book here), encryption means you cant READ the value, even if its disabled, asp.net checkes if the value is still valid. It does this by appending a code at the end of each value, and then compares it on postback. The user can still read the value, but if he change it and postsback, and it wont work. – TheGateKeeper Sep 9 '11 at 18:19
    
Ar ok. Like a checksum. There is one way to set the viewstate to save itself to the database which will probably help you out but I'm away on holiday at the moment so can't copy you the code till next week. – Christian Sep 10 '11 at 12:46
    
One way to help me out would be to check out what i just wrote in the question :) (at the bottom) – TheGateKeeper Sep 10 '11 at 18:20

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