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I have a method that I want to access from only one method because it is very specific and could confuse the programmers if they "see" that method from the other parts of the class. On the other hand, for unit testing and for readability, I have to make that method.

Is there any trick to encapsulate further than usual?

Just to make sure my idea is clear: method A calls method B. I want intellisense to show method B only if I am in method A.

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3  
please not that the term function doesn't exist in C#. Method is the right. –  Desolator Sep 8 '11 at 14:15
1  
What you want is a programming language which allows proper nested block structure :) How about an anonymous method or lambda expression? –  blank Sep 8 '11 at 14:16
    
@Mr.DDD right, I edited –  Mathieu Sep 8 '11 at 14:18
    
go4expert.com/forums/showthread.php?t=3853 but i still does not understand why would you validate thinks within you're own Class ! –  Burimi Sep 8 '11 at 14:32
    
Just make everything public. Stop trying to protect developers from themselves. theprogrammersparadox.blogspot.com/2007/10/goto-next-goto.html –  jrwren Sep 8 '11 at 17:45
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can check the caller of the method, execute your method body only if the caller name matches (assuming you have only 1 method of that name, otherwise you have to check the arguments as well).

Not possible to hide this in intellisense though. Furthermore create a region in the class for the DO NOT USE method.

private void Func3()
{
    // Will not execute the method body
    Func2();
}

private void Func1()
{
    // Will execute the method body
    Func2();
}

private void Func2()
{
    var callingMethodName = new StackFrame(1, true).GetMethod().Name;
    if (string.Equals(callingMethodName, "Func1"))
    {
        // Execute your method's code....
    }
}


An alternative approach using Attributes

Rather than hard coding the method name, you can create a custom attribute and mark your method with it to indicate that you are allowing this caller to execute your DoNotUseMethod().

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Method, AllowMultiple = false, Inherited = false)]
class AllowedMethodAttribute : Attribute
{
    public AllowedMethodAttribute(bool methodAllowed)
    {
        this.AllowedToExecute = methodAllowed;
    }

    public bool AllowedToExecute { get; private set; }
}

And in your class use the attribute as follows,

private void AnotherNotAllowedMethod()
{
    MyDoNotUseMethod();
}

[AllowedMethod(false)]
private void NotAllowedMethod()
{
    MyDoNotUseMethod();
}

[AllowedMethod(true)]
private void MyAllowedMethod()
{
    MyDoNotUseMethod();
}

#region DoNotUseMethod 

private void MyDoNotUseMethod()
{
    var callingMethod = new StackFrame(1, true).GetMethod();
    var allowedMethodAttributes = callingMethod.GetCustomAttributes(typeof (AllowedMethodAttribute), false);
    if(allowedMethodAttributes.Length == 1)
    {
        var allowedMethodAttribute = allowedMethodAttributes[0] as AllowedMethodAttribute;
        if(allowedMethodAttribute != null && allowedMethodAttribute.AllowedToExecute)
        {
            // Execute the method body
        }
        else
        {
            Debug.Assert(false, callingMethod.Name + " is not allowed to execute this method", 
                "Mark method with AllowedMethod(true) attribute to allow execution of this method");
            // throw exception if required
        }
    }
    else
    {
        Debug.Assert(false, callingMethod.Name + " is not allowed to execute this method", 
            "Mark method with AllowedMethod(true) attribute to allow execution of this method");
        // throw exception if required
    }
}

#endregion
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+1 for good approach –  Desolator Sep 8 '11 at 14:31
1  
Ouch! A neat tick, but a maintenance nightmare: It has a "Func1" magic string, it breaks when the compiler decides to do inlining, and, worst of all, it fails silently (instead of throwing some kind of exception). –  Heinzi Sep 8 '11 at 14:34
    
You are right. Hopefully, the second approach eradicates the hard coding! –  Devendra D. Chavan Sep 8 '11 at 15:32
1  
The second approach seems like a very nice alternative and seems to hold water. –  Mathieu Sep 8 '11 at 15:50
1  
Clever code, but not for production software. It is a terrible hack to circumvent a poor design. Never do this for real. –  Mongus Pong Sep 8 '11 at 21:26
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If method B is only related to method A, you may want to revisit the design of the class because you could be violating the Single Responsibility Principle.

That being said, you could implement method B anonymously in the body of method A. In my opinion, this detracts from readability but does yield the behavior you want.

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+1. Reviewing class design can sometimes yield solutions of the problem :) –  Draco Sep 8 '11 at 14:23
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You could make method B available as a delegate variable (e.g. Func<T>, Action<T>, etc.) within method A, but depending on the size of method B, that could get ugly:

private void MethodA()
{
    // Will only be available within MethodA's scope, but has access
    // to all members of the class, just as MethodA does.
    Func<int> methodB = delegate()
    {
        return 42;
    };

    methodB();
}
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Extract that the methods into another class. MethodA is public and calls MethodB. Make MethodB private.

By the sounds of it they comprise a single unit together.

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+1 for good approach. A small addition: then a delegate must be used to access that private method. –  Desolator Sep 8 '11 at 14:37
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Why don't combine content of Method B into Method A? It can be called then from 'A' only.

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It is possible through the use an anonymous delegate/lambda expression. However, there may be better ways to reorganize the code. –  FishBasketGordo Sep 8 '11 at 14:24
    
@Fish I mean if the return type of B is void :) –  Desolator Sep 8 '11 at 14:29
1  
If return type of B is void then you would just assign the anonymous delegate to an Action<T> instead of the Func<T>. The return type of B holds no bearing on whether this is plausible. –  FishBasketGordo Sep 8 '11 at 14:31
    
:D good information –  Desolator Sep 8 '11 at 14:34
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