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I have simple code which throws error: "Object reference not set to an instance of an object"

class B 
{
    public A instance;
}

class A : B
{
    public A()
    {
        instance = this;
    }

    public void DoSomething()
    {
    }
}

class C : B
{
    public C()
    {
        instance.DoSomething();
    }
}

new A();
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closed as not a real question by casperOne Aug 20 '12 at 16:24

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Your code does not throw an exception – Oskar Kjellin Sep 8 '11 at 14:16
1  
What are you trying to do with this code? This looks like a very awkward class hierarchy. – BoltClock Sep 8 '11 at 14:17
2  
I'm pretty sure the last line should be new C(). – dlev Sep 8 '11 at 14:18
1  
@Dzej: This does not make any sense... What exactly are you trying to do here? – m-y Sep 8 '11 at 14:19
    
@Bolt: The only thing I can guess is he thinks by creating a new "A" that B will have the instance of A stored in it... and somehow by a miracle when he creates a new C it will be able to access that previous instance and call the DoSomething method? If that's the case, he's way off his base. – m-y Sep 8 '11 at 14:20

instance will only be initialized if you construct an object of type A, or an object that derives from type A. You don't, though, since C inherits from B only. If you make C inherit from A, the error will go away, since the parent class constructor will be run first, setting instance to a non-null value.

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Your class C inherits from B, whose instance property is not initialized anywhere (except in A, but it is another, unrelated subclass).

So if you created an object of type C (which you don't do in the code above), you would indeed dereference an unitialized reference in C's constructor.

As a side note, it is not a good idea to pass around the this reference before the object is fully constructed (i.e. the constructor call is finished). It may easily lead to prematurely publishing a not fully constructed object, which can cause trouble. Even though this doesn't explicitly happen in the code snippet above, IMHO it is best to prevent getting into the habit of writing such code in the first place.

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Thank you for your answer – Dzej Marko Sep 8 '11 at 14:20

instance doesn't exist at the time you try to invoke DoSomething. It is created in A's constructor, not Bs.

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