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I need to consume a rather large amounts of data from a daily CSV file. The CSV contains around 120K records. This is slowing to a crawl when using hibernate. Basically, it seems hibernate is doing a SELECT before every single INSERT (or UPDATE) when using saveOrUpdate().

I'm confident that the performance issue lies with the way I'm using hibernate for this, since I got another version working with native SQL (that parses the CSV in the excat same manner) and its literally running circles around this new version)

So, to the actual question, does a hibernate alternative to mysqls "INSERT ... ON DUPLICATE" syntax exist?

Or, if i choose to do native SQL for this, can I do native SQL within a hibernate transaction? Meaning, will it support commit/rollbacks?

UPDATED QUESTION TO ANSWER COMMENT

What I mean with the following: "Basically, it seems hibernate is doing a SELECT before every single INSERT (or UPDATE) when using saveOrUpdate()"

Is that for every instance being persisted with saveOrUpdate(), a SELECT is issued before the actual INSERT or a UPDATE. I can understand why its doing this, but its terribly inefficient for doing bulk processing, and I'm looking for alternatives :) Most RDBMS i worked with offers a sane way of dealing with this, and I'm sure the hibernate framework does so as well :)

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what do you mean by " hibernate is doing a SELECT before every single insert (or update) when using saveOrUpdate()." ? could you post the code you are using to save the data ? by the way 120k records is a huge data ! –  Rakesh Sep 8 '11 at 14:25

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to an answer to a similar question, it can be done by configuring Hibernate to insert objects using a custom stored procedure which uses your database's upsert functionality. It's not pretty, though.

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There are many possible bottlenecks in to bulk operations. The best approach depends heavily on what your data looks like. Have a look at the Hibernate Manual section on batch processing.

At a minimum, make sure you are using the following pattern (copied from the manual):

Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();

for ( int i=0; i<100000; i++ ) {
Customer customer = new Customer(.....);
session.save(customer);
    if ( i % 20 == 0 ) { //20, same as the JDBC batch size
        //flush a batch of inserts and release memory:
        session.flush();
        session.clear();
    }
}

tx.commit();
session.close();

If you are mapping a flat file to a very complex object graph you may have to get more creative, but the basic principal is that you have to find a balance between pushing good sized chunks of data to the database with each flush/commit and avoiding exploding the size of the session level cache.

Lastly, if you don't need Hibernate to handle any collections or cascading for your data to be correctly inserted, consider using a StatelessSession.

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I am flushing an clearing my session, I dont have memory issues with the code. I have issues with the extra select! :P I read through the manual, I cant find anything. The data is super simple, no cascading needed. I just need to get rid of the, for this task, redundant select that gets called 120K times :P –  JustDanyul Sep 8 '11 at 15:25
    
@JustDanyul what is the approximate percentage of new entities in this operation (i.e. what percentage of the selects are actually unnecessary)? Are you using versioning? –  jcwayne Sep 8 '11 at 17:18
    
the actual percentage will variate from day to day. However, none of the selects should really be necessary. Most databases today (even "toy" ones like SQLite) provides functionality which will let you automatically update a record if the data already exists. (without having to poll it first, to find out if it exists :)) –  JustDanyul Sep 8 '11 at 18:38
    
You're correct that the functionality exists in virtually any DB you'd be likely to use with Hibernate. But, as best as I can tell Hibernate makes using it impossible. If you don't want to bypass Hibernate and execute the SQL directly via JDBC, your only option is to find other ways to speed your overall import process (e.g. concurrency, tuning of connection pool settings, disable 2nd-level cache, etc.). –  jcwayne Sep 8 '11 at 19:53

The "extra" select is to generate the unique identifier for your data.

Switch to HiLo sequence generation and you can reduce the sequence roundtrips to the database by the number of the allocation size. Please note, there will be a gap in primary keys unless you adjust your sequence value for the HiLo generator

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If you use sequence or native generator Hibernate will use a select to get the id:

<id name="id" column="ID">
    <generator class="native" />
</id>

You should use hilo or seqHiLo generator:

<id name="id" type="long" column="id">  
    <generator class="seqhilo">
        <param name="sequence">SEQ_NAME</param>
        <param name="max_lo">100</param>
    </generator>
</id>
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From Hibernate Batch Processing For update i used the following :

Session session = sessionFactory.openSession();
Transaction tx = session.beginTransaction();

ScrollableResults employeeCursor = session.createQuery("FROM EMPLOYEE")
                                   .scroll();
int count = 0;

while ( employeeCursor.next() ) {
   Employee employee = (Employee) employeeCursor.get(0);
   employee.updateEmployee();
   seession.update(employee); 
   if ( ++count % 50 == 0 ) {
      session.flush();
      session.clear();
   }
}
tx.commit();
session.close();

But for insert i would go for jcwayne answer

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