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I like to use a progress bar while running slow for loops. This could be done easily with several helpers, but I do like the tkProgressBar from tcltk package.

A small example:

pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = length(urls), width = 300)
for (i in 1:300) {
    # DO SOMETHING
    Sys.sleep(0.5)
    setTkProgressBar(pb, i, label=paste( round(i/length(urls)*100, 0), "% ready!"))
}
close(pb)

And I would like to set up a small function to store in my .Rprofile named to forp (as: for loop with progressbar), to call just like for but with auto added progress bar - but unfortunately have no idea how to implement and grab the expr part of the loop function. I had some experiments with do.call but without success :(

Imaginary working example (which acts like a for loop but creates a TkProgressBar and auto updates it in each iteration):

forp (i in 1:10) {
    #do something
}

UPDATE: I think the core of the question is how to write a function which no only have parameters in the parentheses after the function (like: foo(bar)), but also can handle expr specified after the closing parentheses, like: foo(bar) expr.


BOUNTY OFFER: would go to any answer that could modify my suggested function to work like the syntax of basic for loops. E.g. instead of

> forp(1:1000, {
+   a<-i
+ })
> a
[1] 1000

it could be called like:

> forp(1:1000) {
+   a<-i
+ }
> a
[1] 1000

Just to clarify the task again: how could we grab the { expression } part of a function call? I am afraid of that this is not possible, but will leave on the bounty for a few days for the pros :)

share|improve this question
    
Can we add something between the forp and the expression, like forp(1:1000) %do% { expression }? If so, it should be similar to what the foreach package does, and maybe even could be used directly. I don't think you can do it without adding that, but am open to being corrected. –  Aaron Sep 16 '11 at 14:07
    
Thanks @Aaron for your comment. I hope there could be some kind of solution without extra tweaks in syntax. If not, then the working function below will be just fine without any modification. –  daroczig Sep 16 '11 at 19:33
    
We'll see if anyone comes forward with a way with no modification; in the meantime, I did code up my above suggestion, which at least only needs modification at the top of the loop (no extra ) at the end, that is). –  Aaron Sep 16 '11 at 19:55
    
That is cool @Aaron, thanks! If there won't be a solution to escape even a small modification, then the bounty will go to you :) –  daroczig Sep 16 '11 at 20:02
    
You are trying to modify the language. I would be very careful with this... You may forgot many things (like break/continue statements etc.) and prepare ground for future mystery-errors. Be careful with that. –  TMS Sep 21 '11 at 11:00

7 Answers 7

Given the other answers supplied, I suspect that it is impossible tough to do in exactly the way you specify.

However, I believe there is a way of getting very close, if you use the plyr package creatively. The trick is to use l_ply which takes a list as input and creates no output.

The only real differences between this solution and your specification is that in a for loop you can directly modify variables in the same environment. Using l_ply you need to send a function, so you will have to be more careful if you want to modify stuff in the parent environment.

Try the following:

library(plyr)
forp <- function(i, .fun){
  l_ply(i, .fun, .progress="tk")
}

a <- 0
forp(1:100, function(i){
  Sys.sleep(0.01)
  a<<-a+i
  })
print(a)
[1] 5050

This creates a progress bar and modifies the value of a in the global environment.


EDIT.

For the avoidance of doubt: The argument .fun will always be a function with a single argument, e.g. .fun=function(i){...}.

For example:

for(i in 1:10){expr} is equivalent to forp(1:10, function(i){expr})

In other words:

  • i is the looping parameter of the loop
  • .fun is a function with a single argument i
share|improve this answer
    
This does look like a nice version of my pseudocode answer. But: what happens if you want to run an existing function of more than one variable? lply(i, myfunc(x,y)) isn't going to work so far as I can tell. –  Carl Witthoft Sep 8 '11 at 17:19
    
@CarlWitthoft And that's OK, isn't it? Since you can only ever have one variable in a for loop. Any other variables are simply referred to inside the body of the function... Because of scoping up the call stack it will work - in exactly the same way as a for loop. –  Andrie Sep 8 '11 at 17:22
    
Andrie, I think I see yr point. i <- c(1,3,5,6,7,8,9); forp(i,myfunc(x=i,y)) is the way it would work. –  Carl Witthoft Sep 8 '11 at 18:54
    
Thank you very much, this is a neat solution with some compromise (+1). Unfortunately it is bit far from what I am after, but it seems that my goal is unattainable. –  daroczig Sep 8 '11 at 19:00
    
@CarlWitthoft I am not sure that will work. I have edited my answer to give a bit more detail. The equivalent to for(i in seq(1, 9, by=2){expr} would be forp(i=seq(1, 9, by=2), .fun=function(i){expr}). In other words, .fun will always be a function with only a single argument. –  Andrie Sep 8 '11 at 20:37

My solution is very similar to Andrie's except it uses base R, and I second his comments on the need to wrap what you want to do in a function and the subsequent need to use <<- to modify stuff in a higher environment.

Here's a function that does nothing, and does it slowly:

myfun <- function(x, text) {
  Sys.sleep(0.2)
  cat("running ",x, " with text of '", text, "'\n", sep="")
  x
}

Here's my forp function. Note that regardless of what we're actually looping over, it instead loops over the sequence 1:n instead and get the right term of what we actually want within the loop. plyr does this automatically.

library(tcltk)
forp <- function(x, FUN, ...) {
  n <- length(x)
  pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = n, width = 300)
  out <- vector("list", n)
  for (i in seq_len(n)) {
    out[[i]] <- FUN(x[i], ...)
    setTkProgressBar(pb, i, label=paste( round(i/n*100, 0), "% ready!"))
  }
  close(pb)
  invisible(out)
}

And here's how both for and forp might be used, if all we want to do is call myfun:

x <- LETTERS[1:5]
for(xi in x) myfun(xi, "hi")
forp(x, myfun, text="hi")

And here's how they might be used if we want to modify something along the way.

out <- "result:"
for(xi in x) {
  out <- paste(out, myfun(xi, "hi"))
}

out <- "result:"
forp(x, function(xi) {
    out <<- paste(out, myfun(xi, "hi"))
})

For both versions the result is

> out
[1] "result: A B C D E"

EDIT: After seeing your (daroczig's) solution, I have another idea that might not be quite so unwieldy, which is to evaluate the expression in the parent frame. This makes it easier to allow for values other than i (now specified with the index argument), though as of right now I don't think it handles a function as the expression, though just to drop in instead a for loop that shouldn't matter.

forp2 <- function(index, x, expr) {
  expr <- substitute(expr)
  n <- length(x)
  pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = n, width = 300)
  for (i in seq_len(n)) {
    assign(index, x[i], envir=parent.frame())
    eval(expr, envir=parent.frame())
    setTkProgressBar(pb, i, label=paste( round(i/n*100, 0), "% ready!"))
  }
  close(pb)
}

The code to run my example from above would be

out <- "result:"
forp2("xi", LETTERS[1:5], {
    out <- paste(out, myfun(xi, "hi"))
})

and the result is the same.

ANOTHER EDIT, based on the additional information in your bounty offer:

The syntax forX(1:1000) %doX$ { expression } is possible; that's what the foreach package does. I'm too lazy right now to build it off of your solution, but building off mine, it could look like this:

`%doX%` <- function(index, expr) {
  x <- index[[1]]
  index <- names(index)
  expr <- substitute(expr)
  n <- length(x)
  pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = n, width = 300)
  for (i in seq_len(n)) {
    assign(index, x[i], envir=parent.frame())
    eval(expr, envir=parent.frame())
    setTkProgressBar(pb, i, label=paste( round(i/n*100, 0), "% ready!"))
  }
  close(pb)
  invisible(out)
}

forX <- function(...) {
  a <- list(...)
  if(length(a)!=1) {
    stop("index must have only one element")
  }
  a
}

Then the use syntax is this, and the result is the same as above.

out <- "result:"
forX(xi=LETTERS[1:5]) %doX% {
  out <- paste(out, myfun(xi, "hi"))
}
out
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you Aaron, that is great too (+1). Does not perfectly fit my demand, but close :) –  daroczig Sep 8 '11 at 19:08
    
Thank you Aaron again, especially for the updated script. As I wrote before, if we cannot find a "perfect" solution, than the bounty should be awarded to you. Thanks! –  daroczig Sep 22 '11 at 21:13

If you use the plyr family of commands instead of a for loop (generally a good idea if possible), you get as an added bonus a whole system of progress bars.

R.utils also has some progress bars built into it, and there exist instructions for using them in for loops.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer: plyr is a really great tool in most of the time, but I definitely need for loops sometimes (with complex structures where data is spread in several datasets). Unfortunately the linked resource just show an example like I entered in my question, so just several manual ways of adding a progress bar to a for loop, but no ideas of an automatic progress bar what I am after (with e.g. forp function). –  daroczig Sep 8 '11 at 15:35

What you're hoping for, I think would be something that looks like

body(for)<- as.call(c(as.name('{'),expression([your_updatebar], body(for))))

And yep, the problem is that "for" is not a function, or at least not one whose "body" is accessible. You could, I suppose, create a "forp" function that takes as arguments 1) a string to be turned into the loop counter, e.g., " ( i in seq(1,101,5) )" , and 2) the body of your intended loop, e.g., y[i]<- foo[i]^2 ; points(foo[i],y[i], and then jump thru some getcallparse magic to execute the actual for loop. Then , in pseudocode (not close to actual R code, but I think you see what should happen)

forp<-function(indexer,loopbody) { 

pseudoparse( c("for (", indexer, ") {" ,loopbody,"}") }

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the pseudo code! –  daroczig Sep 8 '11 at 19:16

The problem is that the for-loop in R is treated special. A normal function is not allowed to look like that. Some small tweaks can make it loop pretty close though. And as @Aaron mentioned, the foreach package's %dopar% paradigm seems like the best fit. Here's my version of how it could work:

`%doprogress%` <- function(forExpr, bodyExpr) {
   forExpr <- substitute(forExpr)
   bodyExpr <- substitute(bodyExpr)

   idxName <- names(forExpr)[[2]]
   vals <- eval(forExpr[[2]])

   e <- new.env(parent=parent.frame())

   pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = length(vals), width = 300)
   for (i in seq_along(vals)) {
     e[[idxName]] <- vals[[i]]
     eval(bodyExpr, e)
     setTkProgressBar(pb, i, label=paste( round(i/length(vals)*100, 0), "% ready!"))
   }
}


# Example usage:

foreach(x = runif(10)) %doprogress% { 
  # do something
  if (x < 0.5) cat("small\n") else cat("big")
}

As you can see, you have to type x = 1:10 instead of x in 1:10, and the infix operator %<whatever>% is needed to get hold of the looping construct and the loop body. I currently don't do any error checking (to avoid muddling the code). You should check the name of the function ("foreach"), the number of arguments to it (1) and that you actually get a valid loop variable ("x") and not an empty string.

share|improve this answer
    
If you choose to use foreach directly, I'd suggest also using the iteration function in the foreach package, iter; similarly to foreach:::doSEQ. –  Aaron Sep 21 '11 at 16:04
    
Thanks Tommy, that is cool also. As @Aaron was faster and especially for %doX% being shorter than %doprogress% the bounty goes to him :) I can only award you with an upvote. –  daroczig Sep 22 '11 at 21:17

R's syntax doesn't let you do exactly what you want, ie:

forp (i in 1:10) {
    #do something
}

But what you can do is create some kind of iterator object and loop using while():

while(nextStep(m)){sleep.milli(20)}

Now you have the problem of what m is and how you make nextStep(m) have side effects on m in order to make it return FALSE at the end of your loop. I've written simple iterators that do this, as well as MCMC iterators that let you define and test for a burnin and thinning period within your loop.

Recently at the R User conference I saw someone define a 'do' function that then worked as an operator, something like:

do(100) %*% foo()

but I'm not sure that was the exact syntax and I'm not sure how to implement it or who it was put that up... Perhaps someone else can remember!

share|improve this answer
    
Your latter example looks similar to the foreach syntax from the foreach package. –  Brian Diggs Sep 8 '11 at 15:27
    
Thank you @Spacedman too! I am not sure right now how your suggestions can help me to make up a forp function, but will try to catch up :) Will report back. –  daroczig Sep 8 '11 at 15:40

Thanks for everyone for your kind answers! As none of those fit my wacky needs, I started to steal some pieces of the given answers and made up a quite customized version:

forp <- function(iis, .fun) {
    .fun <- paste(deparse(substitute(.fun)), collapse='\n')
    .fun <- gsub(' <- ', ' <<- ', .fun, fixed=TRUE)
    .fun <- paste(.fun, 'index.current <- 1 + index.current; setTkProgressBar(pb, index.current, label=paste( round(index.current/index.max*100, 0), "% ready!"))', sep='\n')
    ifelse(is.numeric(iis), index.max <- max(iis), index.max <- length(iis))
    index.current <- 1
    pb <- tkProgressBar(title = "Working hard:", min = 0, max = index.max, width = 300) 
    for (i in iis) eval(parse(text=paste(.fun)))
    close(pb)
}

This is quite lengthy for a simple function like this, but depends only on base (anf of course: tcltk) and has some nice features:

  • can be used on expressions, not just functions,
  • you do not have to use <<- in your expressions to update global environment, <- are replaced to <<- in the given expr. Well,this might be annoying for someone.
  • can be used with non-numeric indexes (see below). That is why the code become so long :)

Usage is similar to for except for you do not have to specify the i in part and you have to use i as index in the loop. Other drawback is that I did not find a way to grab the {...} part specified after a function, so this must be included in the parameters.

Example #1: Basic use

> forp(1:1000, {
+   a<-i
+ })
> a
[1] 1000

Try it to see the neat progress bar on your computer! :)

Example #2: Looping through some characters

> m <- 0
> forp (names(mtcars), {
+   m <- m + mean(mtcars[,i])
+ })
> m
[1] 435.69
share|improve this answer
    
Just be careful, as a <<- b will be replaced with ` a<<<- b` :-( –  Carl Witthoft Sep 9 '11 at 11:54
    
That's true :) Thanks for pointing out @Carl Witthoft! I have updated my function according to this problem, thought thanks to this modification writing the expression part of the forp function will require the user to use properly formatted syntax (leaving a space before and after the <-). –  daroczig Sep 9 '11 at 12:11

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