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Here is a simple code illustrating the essence of a problem:

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.var = 0
    def set(self, val):
        self.var = val
        print eval('map(lambda x: self.var*x, [1,2,3,4,5])')
f = test()
f.set(10)

It says

NameError: global name 'self' is not defined

I know many people don't like eval but in my case I have to use it because it executes a math formula from the string entered by a user during programm execution. Any suggestions is highly appreciated! Thanks in advance!

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7  
"A math formula" like __import__("os").system("rm -rf /")? – dan04 Sep 8 '11 at 14:48
4  
@dan04: There must be a bug in your formula. It's not working on Windows :) – Tim Pietzcker Sep 8 '11 at 14:52
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Try:

eval('map(lambda x, self=self: self.var*x, [1,2,3,4,5])')

The odd self=self will create a copy of self from the outer context into the inner context (the "body" of the lambda expression).

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Good solution! Thats what I was looking for! :) Thank yo very much! – aliko Sep 8 '11 at 14:46
    
@aliko if the answer solves your problem, you should accept it (the 'V' mark below the votes count on the left). – MatToufoutu Sep 8 '11 at 15:44
    
I wish I could mark all the messages here as accepted but unfortunateley I can mark only one...( Let it be the first correct answer :) – aliko Sep 8 '11 at 19:53

This is a tricky situation. First of all as workaround you can use:

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.var = 0
    def set(self, val):
        self.var = val
        print eval('map(lambda x,self=self: self.var*x, [1,2,3,4,5])')
f = test()
f.set(10)

The reason is not simple to explain... but let's try.

When you write

 lambda x: self.var * x

what is created is a "closure", that will capture the current variable "self" as a non-local variable in the lambda expression because self is a local variable in the current environment.

When this lambda is built by eval however this local variable self is not visible inside eval and therefore the lambda function generated will refer to the global variable self that doesn't exist in this case.

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1  
I did not expected to receive such a helpfull answers within couple of minutes. And yours one is most fundamental... ) It's a great place to ask!:) – aliko Sep 8 '11 at 14:54
1  
You received helpful answers because you stated your problem clearly, in a simplified form, explained why you wanted to do what you were doing, and because the problem was interesting. If all of your questions are like that, you will keep getting good responses. – Wilduck Sep 8 '11 at 15:16
    
Also, if you didn't know already, when you have decided which answer is the best solution to your problem, there is a small checkmark below the number and arrows which will allow you to mark it as "accepted". – Wilduck Sep 8 '11 at 15:20

Eval() also supports setting global and local variables respectively so you could do something like this:

class test:
    def __init__(self):
        self.var = 0
    def set(self, val):
        self.var = val
        print eval('map(lambda x: self.var*x, [1,2,3,4,5])', dict(globals().items() + [('self', self)]))
f = test()
f.set(10)

Update: The above example now maintains previous global and local variables.

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Dan was faster, +1 :) – Andrea Ambu Sep 8 '11 at 14:57
    
The only disadvantage of this approach is that it hides globals from eval. – aliko Sep 8 '11 at 15:04
    
@aliko Thank you, you're correct. I've updated my example to maintain the previous globals. – Dan Sep 8 '11 at 15:29

While I'm sure there is a way to do this without eval, have you tried using string formatting?

eval('map(lambda x: %s*x, [1,2,3,4,5])'%self.var)
share|improve this answer
    
And this approach is working one! Python is all about choices :) – aliko Sep 8 '11 at 14:49

The more generic answer is to pass local variables into the eval environment

The eval function supports two additional parameters, the global and locals variables. So, for instance, you can solve the issue without altering the function by passing:

eval(map(lambda x: self.var*x + myvar, [1,2,3,4,5]), dict(self=self, myvar=123))
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