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The following program successfully builds up a stack , but the 2 operations pop and stack top are giving exception and wrong result respectively. Here is the program :

// Working with stack using Array

/*
 * @author Suhail Gupta
 *
 */
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

char choice;
int *ptrToArray; // this will be a pointer to the array alias stack that we'll make
int stackSize;
int currentStackSize = 0;
int *firstElement = NULL; // this pointer stores the address of the first element in the stack. It initially points to NULL
void push();
void pop();
void stackTop();

int main() {

cout << "Enter the size of stack : ";
cin >> stackSize;
ptrToArray = new int[stackSize];

do {
     push();
    cout << "Push elements ? y/n ";
    cin >> choice;
} while( choice == 'y');

cout << endl << "pop elements ? y/n ";
cin >> choice;
if( choice == 'y') {
    pop();
}

cout << endl << "know the stack top ? y/n ";
cin >> choice;
if( choice == 'y') {
    stackTop();
}
 }

void push() {

if( currentStackSize == stackSize) {        // check before pushing if the stack is full
    cout << endl << "Stack-Overflow !";
} else {
    int numberToPush;
    cout << endl << "Enter the number to be pushed : ";
    cin >> numberToPush;
    firstElement = &numberToPush; // Store the address of the Last number inserted.This is the address of the first element in the stack
    ptrToArray[currentStackSize] = numberToPush;
    cout << "The element you just inserted : " << ptrToArray[currentStackSize] << endl;
    currentStackSize++;     
 }    
}

void pop() {
if( stackSize == 0 ) {
    cout << "Stack Underflow !";
} else {
    delete firstElement; // delete the memory allocated to the first element
    firstElement = &ptrToArray[currentStackSize-1];
    currentStackSize--;
 }
}

void stackTop() {
if( firstElement == NULL) {
    cout << endl << "Stack Underflow !" << endl;
} else {
    cout << "The first element in the stack is : " << *firstElement;
  }
}

The pushing operation works fine.But if i call the pop function the following message is displayed :

enter image description here

Second question :

Now just comment the statement where pop function gets called . The result that i get when trying to know the first element on the stack by calling the function stackTop() is The first element in the stack is : -858993460 . This is some garbage number that i didn't enter while making up the stack. Why the statement *firstElement gives the wrong result then ?

share|improve this question
1  
I assume this is homework? Is the class encouraging that style (many global variables, use of new[] instead of std::vector, helper functions responsible for both I/O and data structure management)? Read about the Single Responsibility Principle, then find a better instructor. – Ben Voigt Sep 8 '11 at 14:52
    
@ Ben Voigt I have not read about std::vector yet in c++ – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 15:50
    
Fine, so you learn about manual memory management. That doesn't excuse use of global variables, or poor program organization that violates the SRP. The wikipedia explanation actually isn't all that good, because SRP is equally applicable to procedural (non-OO) designs, but it should be enough to get you started. – Ben Voigt Sep 8 '11 at 16:11
    
@ Ben Voigt I agree with poor program organization – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 16:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted
int *firstElement = NULL; // Global pointer variable
void push() {
 // ...    
    else {
        // ..
        int numberToPush;  // Resides on stack.
        // ....
        firstElement = &numberToPush; 
        // ...

    } // numberToPush cease to exist from this point.
}

numberToPush is a local variable and have a blocked scope to else part and you are taking the reference of it.This is resulting you the garbage.

Edit: You need to understand that storage duration of global variables are different to that of local. Just taking the reference of local to a global variable doesn't increase the life time of a local variable. As soon as it's scope finishes, the variable ceases to exist.

share|improve this answer
    
but firstElement is a global variable. Will it not retain the address ? – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 14:45

You can't call delete on individual array elements. One new[] must be matched by precisely one delete[].

share|improve this answer
    
then how can i delete the first element of the stack ? – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 15:47
    
You can't. Just delete[] the whole array when currentStackSize==0. – MSalters Sep 8 '11 at 15:52
    
@ MSalters So i should just change the firstElement pointer to the second element (from the top in the stack) during pop operation ? – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 16:03
    
@Suhail: Eh, I'd do something else. Notice that you (1) have another problem, namely that push doesn't do the reverse, and (2), firstElement is redundant anyway. It's far easier to just use ptrToArray[currentStackSize] in stackTop(). And that's currently the only place where you use it. Oh, and think about what happens if you push one element and then pop 2. – MSalters Sep 8 '11 at 22:23

firstElement is pointing to a variable on the stack: numberToPush. When numberToPush goes out of context, the firstElement pointer becomes invalid. Which is why your pointer crashes when delete is called

share|improve this answer

easy...

in your push you did:

firstElement = &numberToPush; 

which make firstElement to get the address of the local variable which will be delete as the function quit. change it to:

firstElement = ptrToArray[currentStackSize];

AND you can't delete a single var in an array.
You should delete the entire array in the end of Main()

Just remove the VAR firstElement - it's useless.
And do that:

void push() {  

    if( currentStackSize == stackSize) {        // check before pushing if the stack is full

        cout << endl << "Stack-Overflow !";  
    } else {

        int numberToPush;  
        cout << endl << "Enter the number to be pushed : ";  
        cin >> numberToPush;  
        ptrToArray[currentStackSize] = numberToPush;  
        cout << "The element you just inserted : " << ptrToArray[currentStackSize] << endl;  
        currentStackSize++;      
    }      
}  

void pop() { 

    if( stackSize == 0 ) { 

        cout << "Stack Underflow !";  
    } else {  

        currentStackSize--;  
    }  
}  

void stackTop() {  
    cout << "The first element in the stack is : " << ptrToArray[currentStackSize];  
}  
share|improve this answer
    
but firstElement is a global variable. Will it not retain the address ? Why? – Suhail Gupta Sep 8 '11 at 14:50
    
it will retain the address, but the address itself is not valid. Performing 'delete' on it is not a valid operation. – EddieBytes Sep 8 '11 at 14:51
1  
It will still have the address. But it will have an address for a variable no longer exists. – Roee Gavirel Sep 8 '11 at 14:53
    
Add some fixes for your code here, not sure it fixes everything but it a start. – Roee Gavirel Sep 8 '11 at 14:58

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