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I have a singleton (I know that is a bad pattern). To control the cleaning process, I'm using a shared pointer. The relevant code is:

#ifndef _GLOBAL_LOG_H_
#define _GLOBAL_LOG_H_

    namespace glog{

        class CGlobalLog;
        typedef boost::shared_ptr<CGlobalLog> globalLogPtr;

        class CGlobalLog
        {
        private:

            static globalLogPtr m_instance;
            LogLevel minimiumLogLevel;
            CGlobalLog(void);

            static void deleter(CGlobalLog *ptr){
                try{
                    delete ptr;
                }
                catch(std:: e)
                {
                    std::cout << e.what() << "\n";
                }
            }
            static void create() { m_instance.reset( new CGlobalLog, &CGlobalLog::deleter );   }  
            void addMessage_(const std::string& appender, LogLevel level /*= LOGLEVEL_INFO*/,const char* msg, va_list args );
            ~CGlobalLog(void);
        public:         
            static globalLogPtr& getInstance();
            void addMessage(const std::string& message, std::string appender, LogLevel level = LOGLEVEL_INFO);

        };
        globalLogPtr CGlobalLog::m_instance;
    };

#endif // _GLOBAL_LOG_H_

The program works fine, but when program finish, an unhandled exception is thrown in this point:

static void deleter(CGlobalLog *ptr){
    try{
        delete ptr; //<-- Unhandled exception
    }
    catch(std:: e)
    {
        std::cout << e.what() << "\n";
    }
}

The catch doesn't catch the exception so I don't know what to do to profile my error. The exact code where error is throw is a boost library file checked_delete.hpp, here:

// verify that types are complete for increased safety

template<class T> inline void checked_delete(T * x)
{
    // intentionally complex - simplification causes regressions
    typedef char type_must_be_complete[ sizeof(T)? 1: -1 ];
    (void) sizeof(type_must_be_complete);
    delete x;
}

How do I need to locate this error? Some ideas?

Thanks!!!

share|improve this question
2  
Why do you have a custom deleter? –  divideandconquer.se Sep 8 '11 at 14:48
2  
what does this line mean? catch(std:: e) –  Andy T Sep 8 '11 at 14:52
1  
and why do you return a reference to a std::shared_ptr from getInstance? –  divideandconquer.se Sep 8 '11 at 14:52
    
When are you calling deleter() ? Please share the code. –  karlphillip Sep 8 '11 at 15:20
1  
Not every singleton is bad. In your case, it is one of the few cases where it is appropriate, IMO. Global logging frameworks are said to be an exception, where singletons are indeed helpful. –  opatut Sep 8 '11 at 15:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I generally don't expect to see a shared pointer on a singleton. Just returning a reference to your singleton and never keeping a reference to it laying around is a good practice.

struct Foo {
  static Foo &instance() {
    static Foo foo;
    return foo;
  }
};

struct Bar {
  void someMethod() {
    Foo &foo = Foo::instance(); // just grab a reference every time you need it
    // ...
  }
};

If you wish to keep the shared pointer and need to clean up resources in manual way, create a tear down method. The boost::shared_ptr will clean up the memory eventually.

Personally, I think using a shared pointer externally is inferior. I wrote some code to demonstrate a tear down and it didn't seem generally applicable without knowing why you need one.

If you want an explicit delete, then write one.

struct Foo {
  static Foo *foo = 0;
  static Foo &instance() {
    if (!foo)
      throw std::logic_error("Already deleted");
    return *foo;
  }
  static void Init() {
    if (foo)
      throw std::logic_error("Already created");
    foo = new Foo;
  }
  static void Destroy() {
    if (!foo)
      throw std::logic_error("Already deleted");
    delete foo;
    foo = 0;
  }
};

In the case of logging, the logic errors should be superfluous. If logging isn't valid when you ask for it, then it is unlikely that your application is in a valid state.

share|improve this answer
1  
If you must delete a boost::shared_ptr use the reset() method: stackoverflow.com/questions/621233/… –  karlphillip Sep 8 '11 at 15:23
    
As explained before, shared_pointer is a trick to force the destruction calling. –  Killrazor Sep 8 '11 at 15:37
    
@Killrazor You can't use a boost::shared_ptr for that. Every copy of the shared pointer owns the memory, that is the whole point. If you want to force destruction, then you have to manage the memory yourself. –  Tom Kerr Sep 8 '11 at 15:45
2  
This answer is wrong. The person is setting up a custom deleter, which is a feature ::boost::shared_ptr supports. That customer deleter is supposed to delete the pointer it's given. That's the whole point. While your comments on the wiseness of this design are spot on, the OP is not doing anything that's technically actually wrong in their deleter method. –  Omnifarious Sep 8 '11 at 16:00

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