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Our .ec program uses the query:

select count(*) from where col >= val1 and col <= val2

Inside the program we use
select count(*) from where col >= ? and col <= ?

Now, the new requirement is we need to search based on a list of values. The list is dynamically generated and we are not sure of the size of the list. If the list contains 2 columns the query will be like

select count(*) from where ((col >= ? and col <= ?) OR (col >= ? and col <= ?))

We are able to frame the query, but we are not sure how to execute this.

The current execution is as follows:

exec sql execute :select_prepare using :val1, :val2

We have all the values in an integer array. Since we are not sure about the number of parameters, got stuck in preparing the execute statement.

The below command didn't work

exec sql execute :select_prepare using :val_array

Could any one provide any solution for this?

Thanks,

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

That seems very awkward indeed. Ah, Jonathan has arrived with the definitive answer. However, my suggestion is a left-field alternative.

One way you could solve this would be to do something along these lines: NB: untested, conceptual code follows

CREATE TEMP TABLE ranges (
    lo INT,
    hi INT
);

for(..){
    INSERT INTO ranges (?,?) USING :var1, :var2;
}

SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT id) FROM table, ranges WHERE col BETWEEN lo AND hi

/* later.. */

DROP TABLE ranges;
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I debated whether to suggest this as an alternative, and decided not to. Just as a point of style, it would be better to use the more modern JOIN notation: SELECT COUNT(DISTINCT id) FROM Table AS t JOIN Ranges AS r ON t.col BETWEEN r.lo AND r.hi. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 9 '11 at 15:44
    
On the other hand, I was surprised to see an ESQL/C question that you hadn't already answered. Halfway through writing my answer, there it was. As far as SQL style goes? What can I say, I'm old skool ;-) –  RET Sep 10 '11 at 8:34
    
Thank you Jonathan and RET, you guys give me enough options. I am going to propose both, and leave the decision to the architect. –  Liju Mathew Sep 12 '11 at 6:44

You will need to create a descriptor - either an sqlda descriptor (see DESCRIBE and sqlda.h) or an SQL DESCRIPTOR. My inclination was to say "it is easier to use an sqlda descriptor", but (on second thoughts) I'm not sure that's really true.

With SQL descriptors, you'll be using:

ALLOCATE DESCRIPTOR
DEALLOCATE DESCRIPTOR
GET DESCRIPTOR
SET DESCRIPTOR

With sqlda, you can use DESCRIBE to get the information, or you can manufacture the descriptors yourself.

Anyway, the net result will be that you write:

EXEC SQL EXECUTE :select_prepare USING SQL DESCRIPTOR :name;

or

EXEC SQL EXECUTE :select_prepare USING DESCRIPTOR sqlda_info;

Note the syntactic oddity that you do not include a colon before sqlda_info.

If you need code that illustrates this stuff, then:

  • DBD::Informix (Perl module, primarily source file dbdimp.ec) uses SQL DESCRIPTOR.
  • SQLCMD (the original one, not Microsoft's johnny-come-lately version) uses sqlda.

In both cases, searching for DESCRIPTOR (upper-case) gives you strong pointers in the right direction.

(I note that you are still going to need to dynamically prepare the SQL; unless you use the temporary table suggested by @RET, the text of the SQL will vary depending on the number of ranges you need to test.)

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