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I am keeping several text log files that I want to keep from growing too large. I searched for and found a lot of people asking the same thing and I found couple of solutions that looked like the efficiency was questionable so I tried rolling my own function. I did the same thing previously in VB6 and ended up using the function in all my apps so I know I will be using it frequently now in my C# programs. This should probably be CW but since marking a question as CW is disabled I am posting it here. My question is, since I will be using this a lot is it efficient, and if not what should I change to improve it? Currently I am limiting the log files to 1MB and these are the largest logs I have kept so I don't anticipate them getting much if any larger.

private static void ShrinkFile(string file)
{
    StreamReader sr = new StreamReader(file);
    for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) // throw away the first 10 lines
    {
        sr.ReadLine();
    }
    string remainingContents = sr.ReadToEnd();
    sr.Close();
    File.WriteAllText(file, remainingContents);
}
share|improve this question
6  
Why don't you use log4net to log ? Your case is very well handled in this component – Seb Sep 8 '11 at 15:02
    
How is ShrinkFile called? Are you using a FileWatcher class to trigger it? – JimSTAT Sep 8 '11 at 15:04
    
In my opinion, sr.ReadToEnd() can be hazardous as it reads the whole file into memory. Not sure the size of the files you are shrinking, but if you hit larger files, this could cause OOM issues and such. I would recommend streaming the rest of the file and writing it out line by line. This is all assuming your files might potentially be larger, and if you plan to TPL this or not (multiple shrinks occurring concurrently). – Matt Thomas Sep 8 '11 at 15:05
    
@Seb - I was unaware of this product until your mention. Log4net looks like it has what I need built in and plenty more. I'm not convinced though that something this simple requires an out-of-house solution. – jac Sep 8 '11 at 15:10
2  
@Beaner: When you need to turn off logging on the fly for performance, or turn it back on for debugging, or email developers when errors occur, or change the format of the logged information, or log timestamps, you'll appreciate the flexibility of log4net. It's a small dependency, and you may already be using it (a number of open source libraries bundle it). – TrueWill Sep 8 '11 at 15:26
up vote 3 down vote accepted

beside suggesting you to use a proper logging framework like Log4Net or NLog (or any other), to improve your code you can at minimum make sure you always close the stream with a using:

private static void ShrinkFile(string file)
{
  using(var sr = new StreamReader(file))
  {
    for (int i = 0; i < 9; i++) // throw away the first 10 lines
    {
        sr.ReadLine();
    }

    // false here means to overwrite existing file.
    using (StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(file, false))
    {
      sw.Write(sr.ReadToEnd());
    }
  }
}

also I have avoided to do the ReadToEnd into a string because you can directly write into the StreamWriter.

share|improve this answer
    
That's why I like to ask a question like this. I did not know about the using statement closing the SteamReader and disposing of it for me. – jac Sep 8 '11 at 15:59
    
Piras - I had to use the intermediate string variable anyway because I got a file in use exception when I tried to open a new StreamWriter with the same file that was opened with the StreamReader. – jac Sep 15 '11 at 18:04

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