Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In C# if I have this in a class:

public int SomeNumber
{
    get { return 6; }
}

How can I read (get) that number from a function in the same class if the function receives a variable with the same name? Example:

public bool SomeFunction(int SomeNumber)
{
    check if SomeNumber (the one passed to this function) == SomeNumber (the one from the public int)
}
share|improve this question
    
if function is static - you can't access this property without creating the class instance, otherwise this property can be accessed from everywhere, even from the different classes which have an instance of currrent one. –  Samich Sep 8 '11 at 15:10
add comment

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Although the other suggestions do work well (and adhere to easier to read/maintain code), they don't directly answer your question. Given a class

public class SomeClass
{
  public int SomeNumber { get { return 6; } }
  ...

And a function with a parameter passed in

  public void SomeMethod(int SomeNumber)
  {
    // Your code here...

You can access the passed in parameter and property like so:

    if (SomeNumber > this.SomeNumber)
    {
      // Your results here

The distinction is that if you refer to just the variable name, it will use the variable from the same scope, i.e. the passed in variable. If you specify use "this." then you always get the class member.

Note: This does not work with Static classes, as there is no instance of the class. (Can't use "this.whatever") and you will be stuck. There are many coding Standards out there and some of them states that it is best practice to use the form "myVariable" for method parameters, "MyVariable" for property names, and _myVariable for property backing stores, to easily distinguish between them in your code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. This is what I'm doing now. Unfortunately I can't rename anything as these are all interface methods and properties from a 3rd party that I am implementing. –  Escobar Ceaser Sep 8 '11 at 16:48
add comment

You would simply invoke the property get in the method:

 public void MyMethod()
 {
      var someNum = SomeNumber; // basically, var somNum = this.SomeNumber;
 }

EDIT: To clarify with OP's edit:

 public void MyMethod(int someNumber) 
 // Change the naming of your parameter so it doesnt clash with the property
 {
       if(someNumber == SomeNumber)
          // Do Stuff
 }
share|improve this answer
    
darn, beat me to it by 30 seconds... –  James Michael Hare Sep 8 '11 at 15:08
    
if only function not static :) –  Samich Sep 8 '11 at 15:08
    
@Samich - Hence the reason MyMethod is a public void not a static public void. –  Ramhound Sep 8 '11 at 15:12
    
@Tejs see updated question. –  Escobar Ceaser Sep 8 '11 at 15:30
    
See Update to my answer. –  Tejs Sep 8 '11 at 15:31
show 2 more comments

Same as if it were a field:

public void SomeOtherFunction()
{
    var x = SomeNumber;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment
public class FavoriteNumber
{

  public int SomeNumber
  {
    get { return 6; }
  }


  Public int Twelve()
  {
     return SomeNumber*2;
  }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I edited the question with more info. Take a look? –  Escobar Ceaser Sep 8 '11 at 15:23
add comment

Please run this code and you will get it.. Use this operator to refer the class level variale.

    public void CheckNumber(int SomeNumber)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(SomeNumber);
        Console.WriteLine(this.SomeNumber);
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.