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Edit: I'm creating a bash script to run Netezza queries.

here's an example of what I have to do:

nzsql -host localhost -port 123456 -d db -u usr -pw pwd -A -t -c "insert into TABLE (name,surname) values ('m','sc')"

and it should return

INSERT 0 1

What I need is retrieve the number "1" which means that 1 row was inserted.

For this, I'd need to retrieve the whole string "INSERT 0 1" and work on it.

according to http://www.enzeecommunity.com/thread/2423 this should work:

cmnd_output=`nzsql -host $NZ_HOST -d $NZ_DATABASE -u $NZ_USER -pw $NZ_PASSWORD -A -t -c "insert into TEST values ('test 1')"`

But I can't get it to work with this: ($2 is right because when I run it from the terminal it works just fine)

cmd_out=`$2` or cmd_out=`"$2"` or cmd_out="`$2`" or cmd_out=`"'$2'"`
cmd_out=$($2) or cmd_out="$($2)" or cmd_out=$("$2")

It tells me command not found... just like if there was a "string quote" problem with $2

I've however managed to execute $2 with eval

eval "$2"

and it works great, the command $2 is executed just fine. But, I can't use eval in this case as I want to store in a variable that "INSERT 0 1".

Thanks

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3 Answers 3

A simple

variable_int=`$function '$arg1' '$arg2'`

without the eval won't do?

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2  
Since this is bash, you should use $() instead of backticks –  Daenyth Sep 8 '11 at 19:31
    
Thanks, I've tried this before, and it didn't work. After a night sleep, I think the problem is somehow related to string quoting... I have that code, in the function $function I evaluate $arg2 as it's a UNIX command variable_int=$($function $arg1 '$arg2' $arg3) with $arg2="mkdir folder" it works fine... the folder "folder" is created as it should... but with $arg2="function_to_eval -option option_value -c \"string with spaces\"" the function_to_eval doesn't have the right behavior... although when I type the content of $arg2 in a UNIX terminal, it executes as it should. –  MSC29 Sep 9 '11 at 10:42

To assign return values from functions to a shell variable, use command substitution

variable=$(function arg1 arg2)

Why do you need eval?

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Thanks, I've tried this before, and it didn't work. After a night sleep, I think the problem is somehow related to string quoting... I have that code, in the function $function I evaluate $arg2 as it's a UNIX command variable_int=$($function $arg1 '$arg2' $arg3) with $arg2="mkdir folder" it works fine... the folder "folder" is created as it should... but with $arg2="function_to_eval -option option_value -c \"string with spaces\"" the function_to_eval doesn't have the right behavior... although when I type the content of $arg2 in a UNIX terminal, it executes as it should. –  MSC29 Sep 9 '11 at 10:39
    
Its time to rethink how you are going to do this if this gets complicated. Why don't you state clearly what you are trying to do ultimately? –  bash-o-logist Sep 9 '11 at 10:59
    
ok. Clearly I've done C, PHP, Perl, ... so I might be over complicating the Bash script... I've got a perl script that creates an array and writes it into the schell script file. In BASH I'm reading an array, parsing each string element, calling a function (which is a part of the string) with argument and one of the argument is evaluated. That's a generic way to execute loads of functions in Bash rather than write the Bash shell script line by line from the perl script. –  MSC29 Sep 9 '11 at 11:10
    
So can you edit your question and put these information in as clearly as possible. No need too much, just relevant ones, like how your "shell script file" contents look like, and what you are parsing from this file and your final output –  bash-o-logist Sep 9 '11 at 11:31
    
Your example doesn't do anything with the return value (which is in $?. It takes the STDOUT of what's called –  Daenyth Sep 9 '11 at 14:32

When you run into a problem like this I find it's always very useful to run with the -x option, just change the top sh-bang line like so:

#!/bin/bash -x

That'll print out each line as it's currently interpreted before executing it. You can see how your variables are being mangled and use that to fix the problem.

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This is more useful as a comment since it doesn't provide an answer to the question –  Daenyth Sep 12 '11 at 3:25

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