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I am creating a tool that monitors what was updated in SVN (via Tortoise) and then does actions based on that content.

I can use post update hooks to get the latest revision number, but if there were no new updates, then I still see that revision number anyway.

Is there a way to find out what revisions were accessed for the first time in the last update?

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closed as unclear what you're asking by David W., Bert Huijben, Ankur, msandiford, Lorenz Meyer Mar 18 '14 at 11:15

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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Please clarify. Exactly what are you trying to do? How does a post-commit hook have anything to do with it? Is the user attempting to see whether they need to update their working directory? Are you trying to synchronize another repository of some sort? Is your tool something that runs only when new stuff is in the repository? – David W. Sep 8 '11 at 22:08
    
We have database scripts coming through in our updates that need to be run against our local db's. I am trying to detect when the updates include scripts created elsewhere and run our special update tool. I said "post-update" not "post-commit". – Savage Sep 9 '11 at 8:33
up vote 1 down vote accepted

We have database scripts coming through in our updates that need to be run against our local db's. I am trying to detect when the updates include scripts created elsewhere and run our special update tool.

I suggest you look at Jenkins. Jenkins is a continuous build system and is designed to do a build every time someone commits code. What Jenkins actually does in a build is up to you. Jenkins can run almost any sort of build script (Makefiles, Ant, MSBuild, and even batch and shell scripts) when triggered. It can do pre-build actions and post-build actions. It can trigger one build after another build is complete.

Jenkins has dozens of plugins which can help extend Jenkins.

The big thing is that Jenkins can pass onto your scripts useful information such a the Subversion revision number that triggered the build. From there, you can parse the output of the svn log to find the names of the files that were changed, and handle them appropriately.

Jenkins is easy to learn and easy to install. You can use it on Windows, Mac, Linux, Solaris, or almost any computer that can run Java 1.6. On Windows, the installation program includes the Java 1.6 run time and installs itself as a Windows service.

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Is that client-side or server-side? My need is client-side. – Savage Sep 12 '11 at 7:13
    
Are you saying these are databases local to the user? Are you using the TortoiseSVN hooks? It's dangerous practice to depend upon TortoiseSVN hooks on a site wide basis because each client must be configured, the hooks must be on the local user machine, and there's no guarantee that someone is using the ToroiseSVN client or has it configured with the hooks. – David W. Sep 12 '11 at 16:34
    
Currently the developers are doing the local updates manually, so I'm looking to improve that process. Back to the question - does Jenkins support client-side? – Savage Sep 13 '11 at 8:17
    
Jenkins doesn't do client side updates. – David W. Sep 13 '11 at 15:43

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