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struct sizeof result not expected

I have this C++ struct:

struct bmp_header {

  //bitmap file header (14 bytes)
  char Sign1,Sign2; //2
  unsigned int File_Size; //4
  unsigned int Reserved_Dword; //4
  unsigned int Data_Offset; //4

  //bitmap info header (16 bytes)
  unsigned int Dib_Info_Size; //4
  unsigned int Image_Width; //4
  unsigned int Image_Height; //4

  unsigned short Planes; //2
  unsigned short Bits; //2  
};

It is supposed to be 30 bytes, but 'sizeof(bmp_header)' gives me value 32. What's wrong?

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3  
Struct data alignment: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_structure_alignment –  birryree Sep 8 '11 at 16:51
6  
s/It is supposed to be 30 bytes/The sum total of each member is 30 bytes/ <-- BIG difference. Break down assumptions when breaking down problems. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 8 '11 at 16:51
1  
Also please do a search first next time. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 8 '11 at 16:52
1  
try changing the first to char Sign[2];. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Sep 8 '11 at 16:52
1  
In the end of the day, though, it doesn't really make much difference because, due to padding, if you have an array of bmp_header structs or something like that, padding will be included between the elements of the array anyway. –  Daniel Sep 8 '11 at 18:50
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marked as duplicate by Lightness Races in Orbit, AndreyT, Mark B, wRAR, birryree Sep 8 '11 at 17:14

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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The reason is because of padding. If you put the chars at the end of the struct, sizeof will probably give you 30 bytes. Integers are generally stored on memory addresses that are multiples of 4. Therefore, since the chars take up 2 bytes, there are two unused bytes between it and the first unsigned int. char, unlike int, is not usually padded.

In general, if space is a big concern, always order elements of structs from largest in size to smallest.

Note that padding is NOT always (or usually) the sizeof(element). It is a coincidence that int is aligned on 4 bytes and char is aligned on 1 byte.

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It doesn't give a wrong measurement. You need to learn about alignment and padding.

The compiler can add padding in between structure members to respect alignment constraints. That said, it's possible to control padding with compiler specific directives (see GCC variable attributes or MSVC++ pragmas).

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struct bmp_header {

  char Sign1,Sign2; //2
  // padding for 4 byte alignment of int: // 2
  unsigned int File_Size; //4
  unsigned int Reserved_Dword; //4
  unsigned int Data_Offset; //4

  unsigned int Dib_Info_Size; //4
  unsigned int Image_Width; //4
  unsigned int Image_Height; //4

  unsigned short Planes; //2
  unsigned short Bits; //2  
};

2+2+4+4+4+4+4+4+2+2 = 32. Looks correct to me. If you expect 30 it means you expect 1 byte padding, as in :

#pragma pack(push)
#pragma pack(1)

struct bmp_header {

  char Sign1,Sign2; //2
  unsigned int File_Size; //4
  unsigned int Reserved_Dword; //4
  unsigned int Data_Offset; //4

  unsigned int Dib_Info_Size; //4
  unsigned int Image_Width; //4
  unsigned int Image_Height; //4

  unsigned short Planes; //2
  unsigned short Bits; //2  
};

#pragma pack(pop)
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