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I have a requirement for a timer that has the following behaviour:

  • Millisecond accuracy
  • I want the tick event handler to only be called once the current tick handler has completed (much like the winforms timer)
  • I want exceptions on the main UI thread not to be swallowed up by the thread timer so this requires Invoke/Send instead of BeginInvoke/Post

I've played around with CreateTimerQueueTimer and had some success but at the same time had problems with code reentrance and/or locks when deleting the timer.

I decided to create my own timer so that I could get a better idea of what is going on under the hood so that I can fix the locking and reentrance problems. My code seems to work fine leading me to believe that I may as well use it. Does it look sound?

I've put in a check if the timer is deleted to make sure that the deletion is complete before the timer can be created again. Does that look ok?

Note: I should say that I call timeBeginPeriod(1) and timeEndPeriod(1) inorder to achieve the millisecond accuracy.

(The following code is converted from vb.net to c#, so apologies for any missed mess-ups}

ETA: I've found a problem with it. If the timer is running at an interval of 1 millisecond, and I call, say, Change(300), it locks up @ while (this.DeleteRequest). This must be because the TimerLoop is in the this.CallbackDelegate.Invoke(null) call.

public class MyTimer : IDisposable
{

    private System.Threading.TimerCallback CallbackDelegate;
    private bool DeleteRequest;
    private System.Threading.Thread MainThread;

    public MyTimer(System.Threading.TimerCallback callBack)
    {
        this.CallbackDelegate = callBack;
    }


    public void Create(int interval)
    {
        while (this.DeleteRequest) {
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(0);
        }

        if (this.MainThread != null) {
            throw new Exception("");
        }

        this.MainThread = new System.Threading.Thread(TimerLoop);
        // Make sure the thread is automatically killed when the app is closed.
        this.MainThread.IsBackground = true;
        this.MainThread.Start(interval);

    }

    public void Change(int interval)
    {
        // A lock required here?
        if (!this.IsRunning()) {
            throw new Exception("");
        }
        this.Delete();
        this.Create(interval);
    }

    public void Delete()
    {
        this.DeleteRequest = true;
    }

    public bool IsRunning()
    {
        return (this.MainThread != null) && this.MainThread.IsAlive;
    }


    private void TimerLoop(object args)
    {
        int interval = (int)args;
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        sw.Start();


        do {
            if (this.DeleteRequest) {
                this.MainThread = null;
                this.DeleteRequest = false;
                return;
            }

            long t1 = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

            // I want to wait until the operation completes, so I use Invoke.
            this.CallbackDelegate.Invoke(null);

            if (this.DeleteRequest) {
                this.MainThread = null;
                this.DeleteRequest = false;
                return;
            }

            long t2 = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

            int temp = Convert.ToInt32(Math.Max(interval - (t2 - t1), 0));
            sw.Reset();
            if (temp > 0) {
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(temp);
            }

            sw.Start();
        } while (true);

    }

        // The dispose method calls this.Delete()

}
share|improve this question
1  
You could try posting this on Code Review –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 8 '11 at 17:29
    
Thanks, I hadn't heard of that site. –  Jules Sep 8 '11 at 18:42
    
What do you mean by "Millisecond accuracy"? Calling Sleep will ensure that your thread is not scheduled again for at least the time specified, but makes no guarantees about when it will be scheduled. –  Joe Sep 8 '11 at 19:50
    
I mean that if I specify an interval of 7 milliseconds then that's what i'll receive give or take a millisecond. A timer such as the system.threading.timer does not provide this level of precision. Also, calling timeBeginPeriod(1) does appear to provide an accurate Sleep. –  Jules Sep 8 '11 at 20:28
    
You know that timeBeginPeriod has system wide side effects and increases power consumption(but I have no idea how much)? –  CodesInChaos Sep 8 '11 at 21:59

2 Answers 2

I would recommend using p/Invoke and using the timers from Win32's Timer Queues:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms686796(v=vs.85).aspx

One should be mindful that the managed CLR environment has a lot of non-determinism built into it, garbage collection, for instance. Just because your timer is has a period of 1 millisecond doesn't mean that that is necessarily what happens.

Also, the documentation doesn't mention it, but the callback invoked by the timer must be pinned in memory and not garbage collectable, via a GCHandle or other construct. When a timer (or timers, if you kill off a timer queue), the callback will be executed one last time. Not sure whether that happens by the internal wait expiring, or by signalling the internal event handle.

Execution of DeleteTimerQueueTimer() and DeleteTimerQueueEx() can be made synchronous, so they won't return until all timers have signalled and invoked their last callback, but doing that would be suboptimal.

If you don't pin the callbacks and prevent them from being garbage-collected, things will go swimmingly...most of the time. You'll encounter random exceptions.

Also, the callback should be smart enough to bail out if the timer is being deleted, lest it make reference to something that's already GC'd.

share|improve this answer

μTimer would be a better example!

You can find it here @ Obtaining Microsecond Precision using .Net without Platform Invoke

It provides accurate wait times down to 1µs and possibly lower depending on your NIC!

Let me know if you need anything else!

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