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How could one convert a string to upper case. The examples I have found from googling only have to deal with chars.

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21 Answers 21

up vote 144 down vote accepted

Boost string algorithms:

#include <boost/algorithm/string.hpp>
#include <string>

std::string str = "Hello World";

boost::to_upper(str);

std::string newstr = boost::to_upper_copy("Hello World");
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3  
That was useful. –  quant_dev Dec 19 '09 at 2:46
5  
This also has the benefit of i18n, where ::toupper is most likely assumes ASCII. –  Ben Straub Mar 9 '10 at 22:07
2  
Your last line does not compile - you have to change to something like: std::string newstr(boost::to_upper_copy<std::string>("Hello World")); –  maxschlepzig Mar 18 at 11:23
#include <algorithm>
#include <string>

std::string str = "Hello World";
std::transform(str.begin(), str.end(),str.begin(), ::toupper);
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5  
Actually, toupper() can be implemented as a macro. This may cause an issue. –  dirkgently Apr 9 '09 at 17:43
1  
Good point dirk (unfortunately). Otherwise I think this is certainly the cleanest and clearest way. –  j_random_hacker Apr 9 '09 at 17:44
3  
a bind(::toupper, construct<unsigned char>(_1)) with boost.lambda will serve perfectly fine i think. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 9 '09 at 18:49
2  
This approach works fine for ASCII, but fails for multi-byte character encodings, or for special casing rules like German 'ß'. –  dan04 Aug 1 '10 at 4:32
6  
I changed the accepted answer to the one using the boost libraries, because it was faster (in my informal testing), easier to use, and doesn't have the the problems associated with this solution. Still a good solution for instances where boost can't be used. –  OrangeAlmondSoap Jan 25 '11 at 3:48
struct convert {
   void operator()(char& c) { c = toupper((unsigned char)c); }
};

// ... 
string uc_str;
for_each(uc_str.begin(), uc_str.end(), convert());

Note: A couple of problems with the top solution:

21.5 Null-terminated sequence utilities

The contents of these headers shall be the same as the Standard C Library headers <ctype.h>, <wctype.h>, <string.h>, <wchar.h>, and <stdlib.h> [...]

  • Which means that the cctype members may well be macros not suitable for direct consumption in standard algorithms.

  • Another problem with the same example is that it does not cast the argument or verify that this is non-negative; this is especially dangerous for systems where plain char is signed. (The reason being: if this is implemented as a macro it will probably use a lookup table and your argument indexes into that table. A negative index will give you UB.)

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The normal cctype members are macros. I remember reading that they also had to be functions, although I don't have a copy of the C90 standard and don't know if it was explicitly stated or not. –  David Thornley Apr 9 '09 at 18:08
1  
they have to be functions in C++ - even if C allows them to be macros. i agree with your second point about the casting though. the top solution could pass negative values and cause UB with that. that's the reason i didn't vote it up (but i didn't vote it down either) :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 9 '09 at 18:32
1  
standard quote must not be missing: 7.4.2.2/1 (poor litb, that's referencing a C99 TC2 draft only), and C++ 17.4.1.2/6 in the glory c++98 standard. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 9 '09 at 18:34
1  
(note the foot-note to it: "This disallows the common practice of providing a masking macro.... blah blupp .. only way to do it in C++ is to provide a extern inline function.") :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 9 '09 at 18:35
1  
... that's achieved by this trickery: stackoverflow.com/questions/650461/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 9 '09 at 19:28

Do you have ASCII or International characters in strings?

If it's the latter case, "uppercasing" is not that simple, and it depends on the used alphabet. There are bicameral and unicameral alphabets. Only bicameral alphabets have different characters for upper and lower case. Also, there are composite characters, like Latin capital letter 'DZ' (\u01F1 'DZ') which use the so called title case. This means that only the first character (D) gets changed.

I suggest you look into ICU, and difference between Simple and Full Case Mappings. This might help:

http://userguide.icu-project.org/transforms/casemappings

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6  
Or the German eszet (sp?), the thing that looks like the Greek letter beta, and means "ss". There is no single German character that means "SS", which is the uppercase equivalent. The German word for "street", when uppercased, gets one character longer. –  David Thornley Apr 9 '09 at 18:11
5  
Another special case is the Greek letter sigma (Σ), which has two lowercase versions, depending on whether it's at the end of a word (ς) or not (σ). And then there are language specific rules, like Turkish having the case mapping I↔ı and İ↔i. –  dan04 Aug 1 '10 at 4:30

Short solution using C++11 and toupper().

for (auto & c: str) c = toupper(c);
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Are there any real world reasons why would you not want to use headers? –  user93353 Jul 22 '13 at 17:24
    
Usually, not significant ones. But consider an online project: in case that someone wants to use a simple function like this, but doesn't want to force all the other project members to download a whole multi - function library that happens to have this function inside, they can simply use a small code snippet like this one. –  Thanasis Papoutsidakis Jul 22 '13 at 18:07
1  
Not everything above 96 is a lowercase letter. This turns braces into brackets and vertical bar (pipe) into backslash. –  Adrian McCarthy Jul 22 '13 at 18:25
2  
toupper doesn't require any library which will not be already included in a C++ project - it's there in both the C & C++ standard library –  user93353 Jul 22 '13 at 21:08
    
@AdrianMcCarthy: I thought so, but I wanted to make it short... Anyway, it seems I've done many mistakes, let me just add en edit that follows the comments above. –  Thanasis Papoutsidakis Jul 23 '13 at 8:58
string StringToUpper(string strToConvert)**
{
   for (std::string::iterator p = strToConvert.begin(); strToConvert.end() != p; ++p)
       *p = toupper(*p);

   return p;
}

Or,

string StringToUpper(string strToConvert)
{
    std::transform(strToConvert.begin(), strToConvert.end(), strToConvert.begin(), ::toupper);

    return strToConvert;
}
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2  
if you don't have access to boost the second solution is probably the best you can get. what do the stars ** after the parameters on the first solution do? –  Sam Brinck Aug 7 '12 at 21:45
typedef std::string::value_type char_t;

char_t up_char( char_t ch )
{
    return std::use_facet< std::ctype< char_t > >( std::locale() ).toupper( ch );
}

std::string toupper( const std::string &src )
{
    std::string result;
    std::transform( src.begin(), src.end(), std::back_inserter( result ), up_char );
    return result;
}

const std::string src  = "test test TEST";

std::cout << toupper( src );
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wouldnt recommend a back_inserter as you already know the length; use std::string result(src.size()); std::transform( src.begin(), src.end(), result.begin(), up_char ); –  Viktor Sehr Mar 9 '10 at 21:24
    
Altough I am sure you know this. –  Viktor Sehr Mar 9 '10 at 21:25
    
@Viktor Sehr, @bayda: I know this is 2 years old, but why not get the best of both worlds. Use reserve and back_inserter (making so the string is only copied once). inline std::string to_lower(const std::string &s) { std::string result; result.reserve(s.size()); std::transform(s.begin(), s.end(), std::back_inserter( result ), static_cast<int(*)(int)>(std::tolower)); return result; } –  Evan Teran Nov 1 '11 at 19:58
//works for ASCII -- no clear advantage over what is already posted...

std::string toupper(const std::string & s)
{
    std::string ret(s.size(), char());
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < s.size(); ++i)
        ret[i] = (s[i] <= 'z' && s[i] >= 'a') ? s[i]-('a'-'A') : s[i];
    return ret;
}
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s.size() is clearly not of type 'unsigned int' –  malat Feb 5 at 12:32
    
s.size() is of type std::size_t which, AFAIK could very well be unsigned int depending on the implementation –  PorkyBrain Jul 31 at 13:09

try the toupper() function (#include <ctype.h>). it accepts characters as arguments, strings are made up of characters, so you'll have to iterate over each individual character that when put together comprise the string

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inline void strtoupper(char* str)
{
    while (*str)
    {
        *str = toupper(*str);
        str++;
    }
}
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std::string value;
for (std::string::iterator p = value.begin(); value.end() != p; ++p)
    *p = toupper(*p);
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Use a lambda.

std::string s("change my case");

auto to_upper = [] (char_t ch) { return std::use_facet<std::ctype<char_t>>(std::locale()).toupper(ch); };

std::transform(s.begin(), s.end(), s.begin(), to_upper);
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This question is 5 years old, it was already answered and probably no one is going to evaluate your answer. Keep it in mind for future reference an check the question date, before posting ;) –  Hristo Valkanov Jun 15 at 2:52

I use this solution. I know you're not supposed to modify that data area.... but I think that's mostly for buffer overrun bugs and null character.... upper casing things isn't the same.

void to_upper(const std::string str) {
    std::string::iterator it;
    int i;
    for ( i=0;i<str.size();++i ) {
        ((char *)(void *)str.data())[i]=toupper(((char *)str.data())[i]);
    }
}
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I know you're not supposed to modify that data area - what data area are you not supposed to modify? –  user93353 Jul 22 '13 at 21:09
    
This is late, but what on earth? That crazy line can be replaced with str[i] = toupper(str[i]); perfectly fine (well, not perfectly fine, but it fixes most of the things wrong). –  chris Jun 9 at 1:14

Simpler and faster if you use only ASCII characters:

for(i=0;str[i]!=0;i++)
    {
          if (str[i]<=122 && str[i]>=97){
             str[i]=str[i]-32;
          }
    }
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1  
The question is tagged as C++, but you wrote a C answer here. (I'm not one of the downvoters.) –  hkBattousai Aug 18 '13 at 17:11
    
I wrote a C answer AND a C++ answer here beacuse C++ is written to be fully compatible with C sources, so any C solution is also a C++ correct solution –  Luke Aug 19 '13 at 8:54
    
But it is so much better to give an answer which respects C++ way. –  Dmitriy Yurchenko Jan 2 at 2:48
    
It is less nice, but faster, smaller and 100% correct –  Luke Jan 2 at 10:16

Here is the latest code with C++11

std::string cmd = "Hello World";
for_each(cmd.begin(), cmd.end(), [](char& in){ in = ::toupper(in); });
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not sure there is a built in function. Try this:

Include either the ctype.h OR cctype libraries, as well as the stdlib.h as part of the preprocessor directives.

string StringToUpper(string strToConvert)
{//change each element of the string to upper case
   for(unsigned int i=0;i<strToConvert.length();i++)
   {
      strToConvert[i] = toupper(strToConvert[i]);
   }
   return strToConvert;//return the converted string
}

string StringToLower(string strToConvert)
{//change each element of the string to lower case
   for(unsigned int i=0;i<strToConvert.length();i++)
   {
      strToConvert[i] = tolower(strToConvert[i]);
   }
   return strToConvert;//return the converted string
}
share|improve this answer
    
.length() is not of type 'unsigned int' –  malat Feb 5 at 12:32

ALL of these solutions on this page are harder than they need to be.

Do this

RegName = "SomE StRing That you wAnt ConvErTed";
NameLength = RegName.Size();
for (int forLoop = 0; forLoop < NameLength; ++forLoop)
{
     RegName[forLoop] = tolower(RegName[forLoop]);
}

RegName is your string. Get your string size don't use string.size() as your actual tester, very messy and can cause issues. then. the most basic for loop.

remember string size returns the delimiter too so use < and not <= in your loop test.

output will be: some string that you want converted

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2  
I don't see how this is simpler than the boost::toupper solution. Can you elaborate? –  tr9sh Feb 14 '12 at 23:11

Without using any libraries:

std::string YourClass::Uppercase(const std::string & Text)
{
    std::string UppperCaseString;
    UppperCaseString.reserve(Text.size());
    for (std::string::const_iterator it=Text.begin(); it<Text.end(); ++it)
    {
        UppperCaseString.push_back(((0x60 < *it) && (*it < 0x7B)) ? (*it - static_cast<char>(0x20)) : *it);
    }
    return UppperCaseString;
}
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If you are only concerned with 8 bit characters (which all other answers except Milan Babuškov assume as well) you can get the fastest speed by generating a look-up table at compile time using metaprogramming. On ideone.com this runs 7x faster than the library function and 3x faster than a hand written version (http://ideone.com/sb1Rup). It is also customizeable through traits with no slow down.

template<int ...Is>
struct IntVector{
using Type = IntVector<Is...>;
};

template<typename T_Vector, int I_New>
struct PushFront;
template<int ...Is, int I_New>
struct PushFront<IntVector<Is...>,I_New> : IntVector<I_New,Is...>{};

template<int I_Size, typename T_Vector = IntVector<>>
struct Iota : Iota< I_Size-1, typename PushFront<T_Vector,I_Size-1>::Type> {};
template<typename T_Vector>
struct Iota<0,T_Vector> : T_Vector{};

template<char C_In>
struct ToUpperTraits {
    enum { value = (C_In >= 'a' && C_In <='z') ? C_In - ('a'-'A'):C_In };
};

template<typename T>
struct TableToUpper;
template<int ...Is>
struct TableToUpper<IntVector<Is...>>{
    static char at(const char in){
        static const char table[] = {ToUpperTraits<Is>::value...};
        return table[in];
    }
};

int tableToUpper(const char c){
    using Table = TableToUpper<typename Iota<256>::Type>;
    return Table::at(c);
}

with use case:

std::transform(in.begin(),in.end(),out.begin(),tableToUpper);

For an in depth (many page) decription of how it works allow me to shamelessly plug my blog: http://metaporky.blogspot.de/2014/07/part-4-generating-look-up-tables-at.html

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In all the machines I tested, it was faster. Perhaps because he is not concerned with a very wide range of characters. Or because using switch() it makes a jump table, do not know how it works in the assembly ... just know that is faster :P

string Utils::String::UpperCase(string CaseString) {
    for (unsigned short i = 0, tamanho = CaseString.length(); i < tamanho; i++) {
        switch (CaseString[i]) {
            case 'a':
                CaseString[i] = 'A';
                break;
            case 'b':
                CaseString[i] = 'B';
                break;
            case 'c':
                CaseString[i] = 'C';
                break;
            case 'd':
                CaseString[i] = 'D';
                break;
            case 'e':
                CaseString[i] = 'E';
                break;
            case 'f':
                CaseString[i] = 'F';
                break;
            case 'g':
                CaseString[i] = 'G';
                break;
            case 'h':
                CaseString[i] = 'H';
                break;
            case 'i':
                CaseString[i] = 'I';
                break;
            case 'j':
                CaseString[i] = 'J';
                break;
            case 'k':
                CaseString[i] = 'K';
                break;
            case 'l':
                CaseString[i] = 'L';
                break;
            case 'm':
                CaseString[i] = 'M';
                break;
            case 'n':
                CaseString[i] = 'N';
                break;
            case 'o':
                CaseString[i] = 'O';
                break;
            case 'p':
                CaseString[i] = 'P';
                break;
            case 'q':
                CaseString[i] = 'Q';
                break;
            case 'r':
                CaseString[i] = 'R';
                break;
            case 's':
                CaseString[i] = 'S';
                break;
            case 't':
                CaseString[i] = 'T';
                break;
            case 'u':
                CaseString[i] = 'U';
                break;
            case 'v':
                CaseString[i] = 'V';
                break;
            case 'w':
                CaseString[i] = 'W';
                break;
            case 'x':
                CaseString[i] = 'X';
                break;
            case 'y':
                CaseString[i] = 'Y';
                break;
            case 'z':
                CaseString[i] = 'Z';
                break;
        }
    }
    return CaseString;
}
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What advantage does this code have over the other solutions posted? –  Konrad Rudolph Mar 9 '10 at 21:27
    
=) It indeeds does the job, but I'd say its a strange coding style. –  Viktor Sehr Mar 9 '10 at 21:27
1  
In all the machines I tested, it was faster. Perhaps because he is not concerned with a very wide range of characters. Or because using switch() it makes a jump table, do not know how it works in the assembly ... just know that is faster :P –  osmano807 Mar 10 '10 at 1:59
    
It seems that here only accept simple answers ... I made this code to the raw performance, and works well for this use. –  osmano807 Mar 10 '10 at 18:21
6  
I think this is a case of sacrificing memory for speed. However, don't reinvent the wheel - in fact that code can be shorted to a couple of lines by just adding 32 to the character, assuming you are dealing with the English alphabet. Which a single addition would be infinitely faster than your solution. I won't up or downvote. Brush up on your coding skills a little bit, not saying what you put is a bad thing but I have seen that coding style many times with the CS students in college and it certainly isn't the best. –  Nathan Adams Sep 12 '10 at 16:54

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