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so I was trying to utilise the istringstream to parse through a text file. The idea is to break down each line by space and based on the substring do stuff. The code works fine except for two things, it double counts last substring for each line and it seg faults when its done reading through the file. I have not used sstream before so any insight would be helpful.

file.getline(str,80);

    while(!file.eof())

    {

        cout<<str<<endl;
        istringstream iss(str);
        while (iss)
            {
                iss >> sstr;
                cout << "Substring: " <<sstr << endl;
         }
        file.getline(str,80);   
    }
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I would highly encourage changing from file.getline(str, 80); to std::getline(file, str); ( cplusplus.com/reference/string/getline ), assuming str is a std::string. At the very least, you don't have to worry about lines that are "too long." –  Max Lybbert Sep 8 '11 at 17:37
1  
what are str and sstr? –  John Sep 8 '11 at 17:39
    
char *str; char *sstr; –  noob Sep 8 '11 at 17:39
    
Thanks a ton guys....works like a charm. I used the getline as the first while loop condition and iss>>sstr as the second while loop condition. –  noob Sep 8 '11 at 17:52
    
I would also highly encourage changing from while(!file.eof()) to while(file) which will also stop on stream errors. –  Mooing Duck Sep 8 '11 at 17:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The while loops should go like this:

std::string line;

while (std::getline(file, line))
{
    std::istringstream iss(line);
    std::string token;

    while (iss >> token)
    {
        cout << "Substring: " << token << endl;
    }
}

The getline and input operations return the stream object, which itself has a specialized conversion to bool that indicates whether the operation succeeded, and it will fail precisely when you've reached the end of the respective stream.

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thanks a ton!! works like a charm –  noob Sep 8 '11 at 18:00

while !eof is almost always wrong.

Switch to a different C++ book, and tell us which one you're using now so that we may mock and warn accordingly.

while (file.getline(str,80)) {
    cout<<str<<endl;
    istringstream iss(str);
    while (iss >> sstr) {
       cout << "Substring: " <<sstr << endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hm, the member-getline is a bit clunky for my taste... as is the magic 80. –  Kerrek SB Sep 8 '11 at 17:51
    
@Kerrek: Indeed, global getline would be better. But I'm just fixing one error here. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Sep 8 '11 at 17:52
    
I have seen !eof() in a ton of books. Could you point me to as to why its a bd idea? nvm found it...thanks!! –  noob Sep 8 '11 at 17:53
    
@Tomalak: Yeah, usually one error at a time is the Right Way. But this time I tried to measure carefully what the OP wanted and what I thought he needed and took a shot... it's thin ice, though -- other times that sort of liberty gets you downvoted :-) –  Kerrek SB Sep 8 '11 at 18:21

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