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I have a code snippet :

int n = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++)
{
    n = checkStatus();
    switch (n)
    {
       case 1:
          break;
          break;//This is unreachable and so i cannot Terminate the For Loop within the SWITCH
    }
}

As described in a comment I cannot terminate the For Loop directly from the Switch, only if I declare a boolean and at the End of Switch test

if(LoopShouldTerminate)
    break;

PS : or maybe I'm very confused!

[POST] I got the message ,and the problem is Solved ,but i would like to asume that using Switch within a for loop isn't a god idea ,because i heard from lot of developer's i should break from loop in the moment when i get the desired result ,so using switch need's extra boolean or push the Int i value to 50 direclty , but what would happen if we're using while loop ?

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marked as duplicate by nawfal, Code-Apprentice, Pieter Geerkens, syb0rg, Alvin Wong May 6 '13 at 2:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
I assume you're using a switch because there are many possible values of n that you've omitted from your code sample? –  BoltClock Sep 8 '11 at 17:36
    
yes ,because it's a Native DataBase ,and im not sure for N Values ! –  Burimi Sep 8 '11 at 17:37
1  
Use i = 50; or move the for() loop into a helper function so you can use return. –  Hans Passant Sep 8 '11 at 17:40
1  
This has been asked and answered before, stackoverflow.com/questions/1987379/…. Use a return statement instead of a break. –  jac Sep 8 '11 at 17:40

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Solution 1: Move the loop and the switch to different methods:

for(int i = 0; i < 50; ++i)
{
    if (DoCheckStatus(i)) break;
}

...

bool DoCheckStatus(int i)
{
    switch(CheckStatus(i))
    {
        case 1 : return true;
        default: return false;
    }
}

Solution 2: Adapt the above to eliminate the loop with an eager extension method:

static void DoWhile<T>(this IEnumerable<T> sequence, Func<T, bool> predicate)
{
    foreach(T item in sequence) 
        if (!predicate(item)) return;
}

...

Enumerable.Range(0, 50).DoWhile(DoCheckStatus)

Solution 3: Adapt the above to eliminate the loop and the helper method:

Enumerable.Range(0, 50).DoWhile(i=> 
{ 
    switch(CheckStatus(i))
    {
        case 1 : return true;
        default: return false;
    }
});
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1  
+1 for eliminate control flow. The LINQ version is so much easier to understand than the loop with nested switch ... not to mention more concise. –  LBushkin Sep 8 '11 at 17:48
2  
just remember that TakeWhile is lazy –  Jimmy Sep 8 '11 at 17:49
    
@Jimmy: good point! Fixed. –  Eric Lippert Sep 8 '11 at 17:57
    
Nitpicking: 'Adapt the above' above the sample? Non native speaker, but shouldn't it be 'Adapt the below'? –  Benjamin Podszun Sep 11 '11 at 10:52
1  
The answer to your first question is "yes". The answer to your second question is too long to fit into a comment so I suggest that you take advantage of the fact that this is a question-and-answer site and ask a question. –  Eric Lippert Oct 15 '13 at 14:40

You can use goto in order to break out of the loop within the switch.

        int n = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++)
        {
            n = checkStatus();
            switch (n)
            {
                case 1:
                    goto outofloop;

            }
        }

    :outofloop
        // more code

One of the few good uses of goto...

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1  
For the love of all things sacred, please don't suggest this... there is always a way to NOT use goto. It is the bane of my existence. –  Chad La Guardia Sep 8 '11 at 17:39
4  
@Chad - care to explain why such a localized use of goto is sooooo bad? –  Oded Sep 8 '11 at 17:39
2  
@Oded its sloppy. I have yet to see a case where some simple re-factoring can't eliminate the tendency to use a goto. For example, extracting the loop to a method and using return would eliminate the need for this particular goto. –  Chad La Guardia Sep 8 '11 at 17:41
4  
@Chad - "GOTO considered harmful" is a relic of abuse of GOTO in specific languages. Like any other programming constructs, it has its place. –  Oded Sep 8 '11 at 17:46
7  
@Chad: "break" is itself just a "goto", and it is not even a goto that does you the courtesy of labelling its target! I agree that there are probably more elegant ways to structure code than a switch nested in a loop, but in this particular case I have no problem whatsoever with stripping away the thin veneer that disguises that "break" is the same as "goto". –  Eric Lippert Sep 8 '11 at 17:57

Just change the value of i:

int n = 0;
        for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++)
        {
            n = checkStatus();
            switch (n)
            {
                case 1:
                    i += 50;
                    break;

            }
        }
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If there is no other code after the switch you can just check in the for loop itself whether to continue looping:

bool doContinue = true;
for (int i = 0; i < 50 && doContinue; i++)
{
    n = checkStatus();
    switch (n)
    {
        case 1:
            doContinue = false;

    }
}
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+1 for being different –  nawfal Dec 19 '11 at 17:59

Can you place the loop inside of a method and just use return?

Example:

myLoopingMethod()
{
    int n = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 50;i++)
    {
        n = checkStatus();
        switch (n)
        {
            case 1:
                return;
        }
    }
}

Another option would be to use a traditional if/else instead of a switch/case. Then you can just use break and it will jump out of your for loop

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awesome..+1 for being different –  nawfal Dec 19 '11 at 18:00

You could use a boolean.

                int n = 0;
            for (int i = 0; i < 50; i++)
            {
                bool shouldBreak = false;
                n = checkStatus();
                switch (n)
                {
                    case 1:
                        shouldBreak = true;
                        break;
                }

                if (shouldBreak)
                    break;
            }
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2  
Yeah, the OP mentions this as an option in his question. –  Oded Sep 8 '11 at 17:40
1  
Don't think that was there when the question was original asked, but whatever. –  mdm20 Sep 8 '11 at 17:48

I don't know if there's other logic that needs to be performed after the loop is finished, but you could try using return instead. The other option is to set a boolean flag, and exit after the switch.

switch (n)
{
    case 1:
        return;
}
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This smells of bad design; there are a couple of ways you could fix this:

If only one condition of your switch would break the outer loop, then simply check for that before entering the switch:

 if(n == 1)
    break;

 switch(n) { }

If multiple conditions can break the loop, refactor to a more linq style query:

Enumerable.Range(0, 50).FirstOrDefault(x => listOfBreakCodes.Contains(checkStatus());

That should call checkStatus up to 50 times until it encounters a 1 (or other break codes), and then doesnt continue evaluating elements.

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