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How can I access an inherited protected field from an object by reflection?

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The question would be better if you stated what you tried (exactly) and what happened (exactly). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 9 '09 at 18:41
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7 Answers

up vote 29 down vote accepted

Two issues you may be having issues with - the field might not be accessible normally (private), and it's not in the class you are looking at, but somewhere up the hierarchy.

Something like this would work even with those issues:

public class SomeExample {

  public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception{
    Object myObj = new SomeDerivedClass(1234);
    Class myClass = myObj.getClass();
    Field myField = getField(myClass, "value");
    myField.setAccessible(true); //required if field is not normally accessible
    System.out.println("value: " + myField.get(myObj));
  }

  private static Field getField(Class clazz, String fieldName)
        throws NoSuchFieldException {
    try {
      return clazz.getDeclaredField(fieldName);
    } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
      Class superClass = clazz.getSuperclass();
      if (superClass == null) {
        throw e;
      } else {
        return getField(superClass, fieldName);
      }
    }
  }
}

class SomeBaseClass {
  private Integer value;

  SomeBaseClass(Integer value) {
    this.value = value;
  }
}

class SomeDerivedClass extends SomeBaseClass {
  SomeDerivedClass(Integer value) {
    super(value);
  }
}
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If there is a security manager, this would fail. You need to wrap up the call to setAccessible and getDeclaredField in a PriviledgedAction, and run it through java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(...) –  Varkhan Apr 9 '09 at 18:32
    
i love you with all my heart –  Or Gal May 21 '13 at 15:13
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Use reflection to access the members of the class instance, make them accessible and set their respective values. Of course you'd have to know the name of each member you want to change, but I guess that won't be a problem.

public class ReflectionUtil {
    public static Field getField(Class clazz, String fieldName) throws NoSuchFieldException {
        try {
            return clazz.getDeclaredField(fieldName);
        } catch (NoSuchFieldException e) {
            Class superClass = clazz.getSuperclass();
            if (superClass == null) {
                throw e;
            } else {
                return getField(superClass, fieldName);
            }
        }
    }
    public static void makeAccessible(Field field) {
        if (!Modifier.isPublic(field.getModifiers()) ||
            !Modifier.isPublic(field.getDeclaringClass().getModifiers()))
        {
            field.setAccessible(true);
        }
    }
}

public class Application {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        KalaGameState obj = new KalaGameState();
        Field field = ReflectionUtil.getField(obj.getClass(), 'turn');
        ReflectionUtil.makeAccessible(field);
        field.setInt(obj, 666);
        System.out.println("turn is " + field.get(obj));
    }
}
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field = myclass.getDeclaredField("myname");
field.setAccessible(true);
field.set(myinstance, newvalue);
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This may not work if there is a security manager that blocks the relevant permission. –  Miguel Ping Apr 9 '09 at 18:01
    
getField(String name) get the public fields only. –  Moro Apr 9 '09 at 18:02
    
@Moro: thanks, I corrected the code –  Maurice Perry Apr 9 '09 at 18:06
    
Thanx for try, but as Javadoc (and I tried it) it Returns a Field object that reflects the specified declared field of the class or interface represented by this Class object. it doesn't go through super classes. –  Moro Apr 9 '09 at 18:09
    
Sorry,it wasn't clear that you didn't new in which class the field was declared –  Maurice Perry Apr 9 '09 at 19:00
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I didn't want to drag in more libraries so I made a pure one that worked for me. It is an extension of one of the methods from jweyrich:

import java.lang.reflect.Field;
import java.lang.reflect.Modifier;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Random;
import java.util.UUID;

public abstract class POJOFiller {

    static final Random random = new Random();

    public static void fillObject(Object ob) {
        Class<? extends Object> clazz = ob.getClass();

        do {
            Field[] fields = clazz.getDeclaredFields();
            fillForFields(ob, fields);

            if (clazz.getSuperclass() == null) {
                return;
            }
            clazz = clazz.getSuperclass();

        } while (true);

    }

    private static void fillForFields(Object ob, Field[] fields) {
        for (Field field : fields) {
            field.setAccessible(true);

            if(Modifier.isFinal(field.getModifiers())) {
                continue;
            }

            try {
                field.set(ob, generateRandomValue(field.getType()));
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException | IllegalAccessException e) {
                throw new IllegalStateException(e);
            }
        }
    }

    static Object generateRandomValue(Class<?> fieldType) {
        if (fieldType.equals(String.class)) {
            return UUID.randomUUID().toString();
        } else if (Date.class.isAssignableFrom(fieldType)) {
            return new Date(System.currentTimeMillis());
        } else if (Number.class.isAssignableFrom(fieldType)) {
            return random.nextInt(Byte.MAX_VALUE) + 1;
        } else if (fieldType.equals(Integer.TYPE)) {
            return random.nextInt();
        } else if (fieldType.equals(Long.TYPE)) {
            return random.nextInt();
        } else if (Enum.class.isAssignableFrom(fieldType)) {
            Object[] enumValues = fieldType.getEnumConstants();
            return enumValues[random.nextInt(enumValues.length)];
        } else if(fieldType.equals(Integer[].class)) {
            return new Integer[] {random.nextInt(), random.nextInt()};
        }
        else {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Cannot generate for " + fieldType);
        }
    }

}
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Do you perhaps mean from a different object an untrusted context with a SecurityManager set? That would break the type system, so you can't. From a trusted context, you can call setAccessible to defeat the type system. Ideally, don't use reflection.

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"Ideally, don't use reflection." Why? The OP is specifically trying to use reflection...while he doesn't say why, there are many legitimate uses for reflection (especially in test code). –  David Citron Apr 9 '09 at 18:19
    
Whilst there are legitimate uses of reflection, most are not. In particular if you are creeping around the legacy ability to respect Java (1.0) language access rules, you probably don't need it. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 9 '09 at 18:40
    
@Tom ...unless you're trying to write specific JUnit test cases without loosening access rules simply for the test case –  David Citron Apr 9 '09 at 22:30
    
Unit testing is "interesting". You could argue that it forces your code to be cleaner (alternatively unnecessarily general). Tests don't necessarily follow the usual rules of nice code. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Apr 9 '09 at 23:35
    
yes Tom, It was test case issue –  Moro Apr 15 '09 at 15:06
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You could do something like...

Class clazz = Class.forName("SuperclassObject");

Field fields[] = clazz.getDeclaredFields();

for (Field field : fields) {
    if (field.getName().equals("fieldImLookingFor")) {
        field.set...() // ... should be the type, eg. setDouble(12.34);
    }
}

You might also need to change the accessibility, as noted in Maurice's answer.

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Returns an array of Field objects reflecting all the fields declared by the class or interface represented by this Class object. It didn't go through the super classes –  Moro Apr 9 '09 at 18:06
    
Could you be more specific with the issue? You're saying it only obtained the fields in your subclass? Have you made sure that the Class.forName() method is being passed the name of the superclass, and that the accessibility has been modified, as Maurice suggested? –  Craig Otis Apr 9 '09 at 18:17
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A generic utility method to run any getter in this or any superclass.

Adapted from Marius's answer.

public static Object RunGetter(String fieldname, Object o){
    Object result = null;
    boolean found = false;
    //Search this and all superclasses:
    for (Class<?> clas = o.getClass(); clas != null; clas = clas.getSuperclass()){
        if(found){
           break;
        }
        //Find the correct method:
        for (Method method : clas.getDeclaredMethods()){
            if(found){
                break;
            }
            //Method found:
            if ((method.getName().startsWith("get")) && (method.getName().length() == (fieldname.length() + 3))){ 
                if (method.getName().toLowerCase().endsWith(fieldname.toLowerCase())){                            
                    try{
                        result = method.invoke(o);  //Invoke Getter:
                        found = true;
                    } catch (IllegalAccessException | InvocationTargetException ex){
                        Logger.getLogger("").log(Level.SEVERE, "Could not determine method: " + method.getName(), ex);
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Hopefully that is useful to someone.

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