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Im having some problems to handle constructor exception in derived classes. When the derived class constructor throws an error, but the parent class has allocated some objects. Will the parent class destructor be called?

Example:

class A
{
  A() { /* Allocate some stuff */ };

  virtual ~A() { /* Deallocate stuff */ };
};

class B : public A
{
  B() 
  { 
    /* Do some allocations */
    ...

    /* Something bad happened here */
    if (somethingBadHappened) 
    {
      /* Deallocate B Stuff */
      ...

      /* Throws the error */
      throw Error; /* Will A destructor be called? I know B destructor won't */
    };

  };

  ~B() { /* Deallocate B Stuff */ };
}

And i was wondering if it is a good idea to do the following:

B()
{ 
  /* Do some allocations */
  ...

  /* Something bad happened here */
  if (somethingBadHappened) 
  {
    /* Deallocate B Stuff */
    this->~B();

    /* Throws the error */
    throw Error; /* Will A destructor be called? I know B destructor won't */
  };
};

If not, whats is a decent way to do such things?

share|improve this question
    
Did you try anything yourself? You can put debug messages into the various constructors and destructors to see what happens. –  Kerrek SB Sep 8 '11 at 18:37
    
explicitly calling the destructor will not deallocate memory allocated for the object. –  Daniel Sep 8 '11 at 18:37
    
    
@Daniel: Also, you cannot call your own destructor inside the constructor, because at that stage you don't have a live object yet. –  Kerrek SB Sep 8 '11 at 18:38
    
@Kerrek: good point. –  Daniel Sep 8 '11 at 18:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

An exception will cause the stack to unwind to a point where the exception is properly caught. This means that any objects created in the scope prior to where the exception is thrown will be destructed, including base class objects as in this example.

Try this:

#include <iostream>

class A
{
public:
  A() { std::cout << "A::A()\n";}
  ~A() {std::cout << "A::~A()\n";}
};

class B : public A
{
public:
   B()
   {
      std::cout << "B::B()\n";
      throw 'c';
   }

   // note: a popular point of confusion -- 
   //   in this example, this object's destructor
   //   WILL NOT BE CALLED!
   ~B()
   {
      std::cout << "B::~B()\n";
   }
};


int main()
{
   try
   {
      B b;
   }

   catch(...)
   {
      std::cout << "Fin\n";
   }
   return 0;
}

Output should be: (note B::~B() is not called)

A::A()
B::B()
A::~A()
Fin

Calling the destructor manually as you've shown in your question will be safe as long as you don't try to free resources that you've not yet allocated. Better to wrap those resources in some type of RAII container (std::auto_ptr, boost::shared_ptr, etc.)to avoid the necessity of calling the destructor.

Mooing Duck has provided a very nice illustration of how the stack unwinding works when an exception is thrown in a constructor:

Stack Unwinding during constructor exception

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer to the first part, what about this->~B? –  Mooing Duck Sep 8 '11 at 18:38
    
See the edit. Missed the second question. –  Chad Sep 8 '11 at 18:48
    
Well, thank you. About the first question, i got it now. On the second one, i think it will be a real mess to call the destructor since A::~() will be called twice. But i will initialize dangerous pointers to null and make a function to do the cleanup. –  renan Sep 9 '11 at 22:30
    
Here's a graphic I made that shows the steps in construction/throwing/unwinding: i.imgur.com/LZXxH.png We could include it in the answer if you wanted. –  Mooing Duck Jul 27 '12 at 16:35
    
Very nice, thanks. –  Chad Jul 27 '12 at 17:05

Your abortive attempt to write a clean constructor B::B() in the second part of the question highlights the awkwardness of a design that takes too much responsibility in one class. If you use only single-responsibility components, you can often get away with not writing any explicit error checks at all and let the exception handling mechanism do its work, recursively.

Consider this:

B::B()
{
  try { this->p1 = get_dangerous_pointer(); }
  catch(...) { throw; } // OK

  try { this->p2 = suicidal_function(); }
  catch(...) {
    clean_up(p1);
    throw;
  }

  try { this->p3 = get_monstrous_amounts_of_memory(); }
  catch(...)
  {
    clean_up(p2);
    clean_up(p1);
    throw;
  }
}

As you can see, writing a correct constructor for a class that has even just three different responsibilities is a maintenance nightmare.

The correct solution is to make each resource owned by a wrapper class whose only responsibility is to own that resource, and clean-up happens automagically even in the face of the most exceptional exception.

Also note that you have to be extremely careful when calling member functions from within any constructor. An object's lifetime doesn't begin until after a constructor has finished, so while you're in the constructor you're working with an "object under construction" - a bit like open-heart surgery... on yourself. In particular, you mustn't call the destructor, because you are only allowed to destroy complete objects.

share|improve this answer

The best idea is to catch exceptions within the construct and then put the object into a state where things will produce the errors (e.g. object to read file, opening file in constructor fails, then the read will not work).

Just keep the object consistent.

share|improve this answer
    
If you can keep the object consistent there is no need to throw an exception. But what if just you cannot create the object? –  Bo Persson Sep 8 '11 at 20:42

Haven't thought this all the way through but maybe consider creating the object in a try/catch block. If the constructor throws an exception, delete the object if it was created using new.

try
{
    B* b = new B();
}
catch
{
    delete b;
    //log error
}

If you do not use new to allocate memory for b, you do not need to call delete in the catch block.

Make sure that your B destructor doesn't call delete on objects that were never created. I would recommend setting all members that are pointers to objects equal to 0 in your constructor before doing anything that could cause an exception. That way, if the destructor is called, deleteing them is safe.

share|improve this answer
    
If B() throws there is no object to delete. –  Bo Persson Sep 8 '11 at 20:43
    
@Bo: The memory for the object will already have been allocated. –  Daniel Sep 8 '11 at 20:47
1  
No, if the constructor does not complete nothing is assigned to b. The exception might also be bad_alloc and then there is definitely nothing to delete. –  Bo Persson Sep 8 '11 at 20:51

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