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EDITED

I'm trying to have source files recompiled without having to specify header files for each CPP in the makefile.

I'm down to :

#CoreObj1.cpp(and .h)
#CoreObj2.cpp(and .h)

#This is the makefile.

CORE_COMPONENT_OBJECTS = \
  obj/CoreObj1.o \
  obj/CoreObj2.o \

# Objects
obj/%.o: %.cpp obj/%.d
        @mkdir -p obj
        $(CXX) $(CXX_CFLAGS) -c $*.cpp -o $@

# Dependencies
obj/%.d: %.cpp
        @mkdir -p obj
        $(CXX) $(CXX_CFLAGS) -MM -MF $@ $<

DEPS = $(CORE_COMPONENT_OBJECTS:.o=.d)

ifneq ($(MAKECMDGOALS),clean)
-include $(DEPS)
endif   

But modifying a header files does not trigger the source files including it to be recompiled.

NOTE: In fact, it works if my .o, .d and .cpp are in the same folder. But if my .d and .o are in a obj/ folder, it doesn't trigger the recompile.

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2  
I deal with dependencies like this by using proper build system like automake or cmake ;) In my experience Makefile's quickly become unmaintainable. –  Benjamin Bannier Sep 8 '11 at 20:08
    
@honk It depends on the project (size/complexity); makefiles become unmaintainable because programmers are rarely keep them organized and cleaned, leaving this as a low priority task, plus usually are not aware about most of make's features –  pmod Sep 8 '11 at 20:55
    
After your fourth edit, your question is lacking a question, problem, error report, anything... –  eriktous Sep 8 '11 at 23:43
    
@eriktous: I've simplified the problem, since I thought my problem was with multiple makefiles, but it didn't work for a single makefile. If you re-read the (current) question, I think it makes sense. I've edited the title also. –  zedxz Sep 9 '11 at 0:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You don't have dependency file as a prerequisite for compilation rule. Should be something like this:

#This is the rule for creating the dependency files
src/%.d: src/%.cpp
    $(CXX) $(CXX_CFLAGS) -MM -MF $(patsubst obj/%.o,obj/%.d,$@) -o $@ $<

obj/%.o: %.cpp %.d
    $(CXX) $(CXXFLAGS) -o $@ -c $<

-include $(SRC:%.cpp=%.d)

The last string adds dependency on headers.

EDIT

I see you have

-include $(DEPS)

but check with $(warning DEPS = $(DEPS)) whether you really include existing files, otherwise make just silently ignore these.

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Interesting. But will this gather dependencies from core_component ? –  zedxz Sep 8 '11 at 20:53
    
Updated: the key thing is too add dependency files, which contains dependency on headers –  pmod Sep 8 '11 at 21:00
    
Just wondering in your update: where does SRC come from and did you mean %.cpp instead of %.c ? –  zedxz Sep 8 '11 at 21:21
    
SRC is a list of source files. It should be place in your makefiles where you have it or you may replace with your $(COMPONENTX_OBJECTS:%.o=%.d). Just check whether the list of DEPS is complete and %.d files are generated correctly - with all dependent headers –  pmod Sep 8 '11 at 21:27
    
I've narrowed down the problem to a single component so far, since it doesn't seem to work for a single component anyway. Please see my edited question. –  zedxz Sep 8 '11 at 23:10

People often have such rules for dependency generation, but they are really unnecessary.

The first time a project is built no dependencies are necessary since it builds all sources anyway. It is only the subsequent builds that require the dependencies from the previous build to detect what needs to be rebuild.

Therefore, the dependencies are really a by-product of compilation. Your rules should look like the following:

#CoreObj1.cpp(and .h)
#CoreObj2.cpp(and .h)

#This is the makefile.

CORE_COMPONENT_OBJECTS = \
  obj/CoreObj1.o \
  obj/CoreObj2.o \

# Objects
obj/%.o: %.cpp
        @mkdir -p obj
        $(CXX) $(CXX_CFLAGS) -c -o $@ -MD -MP -MF ${@:.o=.d} $<

DEPS = $(CORE_COMPONENT_OBJECTS:.o=.d)

ifneq ($(MAKECMDGOALS),clean)
-include $(DEPS)
endif   

As a side note, mkdir -p is not parallel make friendly. For example, when two or more processes race to create /a/b/c/ and /a/b/cc/ when /a/b/ doesn't exist, one mkdir process may fail with EEXIST trying to create /a/b/.

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It's better to use SCons/CMake/bjam to solve "header dependencies problem" than use make

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... and become bjam's 14th user. –  Maxim Egorushkin Sep 9 '11 at 14:47

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