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This is my first time on Stackoverflow. I was making a program to find out MPG for a car. I was wondering how can I make the cin statement only accept positive integers only? and also, if you do enter a invalid input, can you reset it? I am not sure if that makes sense. I didn't have to do this for class. I was just curious on how to do it. Here is the code.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
double tank, miles, mpg;

cout << "Hello. This is a program that calculates the MPG ( Miles Per Gallon) for      your\n" ;
cout << "vehicle\n" << endl;
cout << "Please enter how many gallons your vehicle can hold\n" << endl;
cin >> tank;
cout << endl;
cout << "Please enter how many miles that have been driven on a full tank\n" <<endl;
cin >> miles;
cout << endl;

mpg = (miles)/(tank);
cout << "Your vehicle recieves " << mpg << " miles per gallon\n" << endl;
system ("pause");
return 0;
}
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3  
Not an answer to your question, but if you want integers you shouldn't be asking for doubles. –  K-ballo Sep 8 '11 at 20:24
    
Ask for an integer first - then deal with the fact that it is not positive. Even better just read strings and then parse them to ensure that is what is required/ Flag an error if somebody enters something that is not requires and give them another opportunity. –  Ed Heal Sep 8 '11 at 20:27
    
Yup, you can't physically remove keys from the keyboard. People will make input errors. –  MSalters Sep 8 '11 at 22:39

5 Answers 5

iostreams are not a toolkit for building a complex UI. Unless you want to write your own rather complex stream to wrap the usual stream, there is no way you are going to get it to either (a) only accept positive integers or (b) interact politely with a user who types in something else.

You should just read lines from cin, and print your own error prompts and such after you look at what you get.

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I think the last sentence describes exactly the question. He hasn't asked for anything fancy. –  Potatoswatter Sep 8 '11 at 23:28
cout << "Hello. This is a program that calculates the MPG ( Miles Per Gallon) for      your\n" ;
cout << "vehicle\n" << endl;
do
{
     cout << "Please enter how many gallons your vehicle can hold\n" << endl;
     cin >> tank;
     cout << endl;
} while (tank <= 0 && ((int)tank != tank));
do
{
     cout << "Please enter how many miles that have been driven on a full tank\n" <<endl;
     cin >> miles;
     cout << endl;
} while (miles <= 0 && ((int)miles != miles));

If you do this after running the statements it will rerun them if the answer is 0 or lower or is not an integer. If you make the variables ints instead of doubles then you can remove the "&& ((int)miles == miles)" part of the while statement.

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I see that you get what I mean but when I put it in my code, it just constantly repeats the same thing. It keeps saying Please enter how many gallons your vehicle can hold. And I did change it to int and not double. –  Sujay Sep 8 '11 at 21:40
    
Oh my! i seem to have typed == when I meant != I edited the post it should work now –  annirun Sep 9 '11 at 1:27

Wow, 5 answers already. Your question and the answer are very straightforward.

cin extraction validates the input for whatever type you get. So just read into a nonnegative integer type, namely unsigned.

If validation fails, then cin evaluated as a Boolean is false. Always test if ( cin ) after extracting. if ( cin >> variable ) means the same.

After failure, you reset cin using cin.clear(). You also have to remove the offending input, such as by cin.ignore as below, which skips everything up to the next newline. Until clear is called, the >> operator is disabled to avoid corrupting the input further, so that you can always go back and retry from the exact point of failure.

Putting it all together,

unsigned tank;

do {
    if ( ! std::cin ) {
        std::cin.clear();
        std::cin.ignore( std::numeric_limits< streamsize >::max(), '\n' );
    }
    std::cout << "How big is the tank?\n";
} while ( ! ( std::cin >> tank ) || tank == 0 );
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I had to add () around std::cin >> tank, and if I enter a letter, it prints How big is the tank? over and over and over in a repeating loop. –  Almo Jul 18 '12 at 14:19
    
@Almo thanks, I should have run it. Working now. –  Potatoswatter Jul 22 '12 at 2:21

Still, there are a couple of standard ways to do it in a command line environment.

You could trap the cin statement in a loop that doesn't release until a valid input has been entered. This is the "standard" way to validate CLI input, not just signed numbers.

do
{
    cout << "\nPlease enter...";
    cin >> tank;
}
while (tank < 0)

The condition in the while statement is the place to validate the data. You can also make an if statement to explain why the input is invalid.

The other way is to simply force the value to be positive, by simply going tank = fabs(tank);, which takes the absolute value (i.e. positive) of the tank variable.

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2  
This will go into an endless loop if, say, a letter is entered. –  Potatoswatter Sep 8 '11 at 23:05
    
Actually it is undefined behaviour, since tank is uninitialized to begin with and therefore not guaranteed to be initialized by the time the conditional is reached the first time. –  Karl Knechtel Sep 8 '11 at 23:30
    
Really? Potatoswatter, if a letter is entered, shouldn't it just consider the condition to be false, loop and do a new cin? Karl: tank can be uninitialized, since the path will take it through the cin first. That's the merit of do ... while instead of while. –  Ivan Milles Oct 21 '11 at 16:47

Instead of

cin >> miles;

Try

while ( (cin >> miles) < 0 )
 cout << "Please enter how many gallons your vehicle can hold\n" << endl;

That will repeat the question until the input is positive. You can do that for the rest of the questions too.

Note that input streams are not intended for input filtering. You have to provide your own logic for that.

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6  
The expression cin >> miles returns cin, so I'm not sure how this is supposed to work. –  user786653 Sep 8 '11 at 20:36
    
This also doesn't do any error checking for non-numeric output. –  Karl Knechtel Sep 8 '11 at 23:28

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